croquet


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croquet

(krōkā`), lawn game in which the players hit wooden balls with wooden mallets through a series of 9 or 10 wire arches, or wickets. The first player to hit the posts placed at each end of the field wins. The game developed in France in the 17th cent. Though the American public identifies it as a casual picnic sport, higher levels of play that feature manicured playing surfaces, skilled shotmaking, and cutthroat strategy increased in the 1980s. An annual contest between the United States Naval Academy and St. John's College of Annapolis is a growing rivalry.

Croquet

 

a sport in which each player uses a wooden mallet to knock a ball through a number of wire wickets in a specified order, and as fast as possible, to hit the goal—the opponent’s peg —and then to return the ball to its own peg.

Croquet was played in France in the 17th century and spread in the 19th century to many countries, including Russia, primarily as a means of relaxation and amusement. The game is played on an even earthen or grassy court of arbitrary size (24–90 m long and 13.5–45 m wide). The balls are 8.28 cm in diameter; the mallet handle is up to 1 m in length; the wickets are of no set size (approximately 25 × 25 cm). In the late 19th century roque, a variant of croquet, appeared; played on a clay court 18 × 19m with fixed wickets only 2.54 cm wider than the ball, it was included in the Olympic program in 1904. Official croquet and roque competitions are not held.

crocket

crocket
In Gothic architecture and derivatives, an upward-oriented ornament, often vegetal in form, regularly spaced along sloping or vertical edges of emphasized features such as spires, pinnacles, and gables.

croquet

a game for two to four players who hit a wooden ball through iron hoops with mallets in order to hit a peg
www.croquet.org.uk
www.croquetamerica.com
References in classic literature ?
A pleasant green field, with three wide-spreading oaks in the middle and a smooth strip of turf for croquet.
She pities him, so she is good to him," aid Jo, beaming at her from the croquet ground.
An impromptu circus, fox and geese, and an amicable game of croquet finished the afternoon.
It seemed fated that he should feel something of the past in the accidents of that place, for the figure might well have been an early-Victorian ghost revisiting the ghosts of the croquet hoops and mallets.
Here," remarked the old gentleman, taking up a croquet mallet from the table near him, "is one of the qualifications for success in modern society.
But now, as I strolled out on the lawn, still nursing a grudge against my friend's high-handedness, I saw Lawrence on the croquet lawn, aimlessly knocking a couple of very ancient balls about, with a still more ancient mallet.
The truth of the matter was that it was Lawrence who had murdered Alfred Inglethorp with a croquet mallet.
Later on I heard the noise of croquet balls, and looked out again, and it was Charles Wilcox practising; they are keen on all games.
Betsy reminded her that Liza Merkalova and Baroness Shtoltz were coming to play croquet with her that morning with their adorers, Kaluzhsky and old Stremov.
Nothing classes up a barbecue afternoon like a game of croquet--and the Sportcraft Garden Collection Croquet Set ($165) is a good place to start.
My first experience of croquet got me hooked--not on the game people tease me about, which has a reputation for being spiteful, and where you hit your opponent's balls into the rhododendron bushes (in the real game this would be a foul shot)--but on the game with a subtle blend of strategy and tactics, on the game where you have to anticipate what your opponent is likely to do next, where you have to think a few moves ahead, and where you constantly balance the pros and cons of taking a risk against playing safe.
SINCE John Prescott has turned croquet into the "people's game" why don't you get your own set for the summer?