cross effect

cross effect

[′krȯs i‚fekt]
(physics)
Any phenomenon in which two or more transport effects are coupled, such as thermal and electrical conductivity, or thermal conductivity and diffusion.
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The cross effect of the two dummies (financial distress and the significant rise in the use of trade payables) measures the marginal effect of a rise in trade credit financing on the performance of a firm in financial distress.
Gordon Winston ["Taxes, Leisure and Public Goods," Economica, 1965] also points out that when leisure and public spending are complementary, the ordinal cross effect of the spending change on the demand for leisure is positive.
ii], = Price Cross effect of product i' on Product i
First of all, we have the case where the cross effect in the poaching function is weak and negligible so that [h.
To test for inbreeding depression in measurement variables, mixed-model analyses of variance was used, in which cross effect is fixed, family and plot effects are random, and interactions are random.
The effect of the accompanying balanced-budget spending change, however, depends on the sign of the ordinary (Marshallian) cross effect, l.
Then, given Equations (3) and (4) and the assumption that cross effect coefficients are symmetric ([[theta].
Although there is significant variation among populations for these traits, there is no cross effect or population by cross interaction (table 5).
8] also is negative, implying that home health care has a negative cross effect with respect to hospital coinsurance.
The availability cross effect of, say, alternative A on alternative B captures the extent to which the addition of alternative A to a choice set that already contains B leads to a larger or smaller decrease in the utility, and hence, choice probability (or share), of B than would be predicted from the MNL model.