cross-bench


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cross-bench

Brit a seat in Parliament occupied by a neutral or independent member
References in periodicals archive ?
Sir Patrick said he already had a degree of cross-bench support for his candidacy.
It is a friendly place and though there are strong political disagreements, the presence of cross-bench members, many of whom bring a wider range of experience and expertise than is generally found in the Commons, helps to promote a generally constructive atmosphere.
The 61-year-old - made a cross-bench peer in 2010 - did not take questions from reporters about his appointment, and instead went to meet BBC staff.
The respected cross-bench peer also warned of a morale crisis among officers due to a lack of government support.
FRESH fears that S4C could effectively be taken over by the BBC were voiced last night after a meeting between BBC director general Mark Thompson and cross-bench peers.
The cross-bench peer, who retired as a judge in 2005,said ministers must "take into account" the enormous importance of protecting Venables's anonymity.
Lord Ackner, the cross-bench peer behind the clause, said it should remain.
The move follows Tuesday's double defeat for the Government in the Lords, when a powerful group of Conservative, Liberal Democrat and cross-bench peers crushed the Government twice on the orders setting up the ballot.
The evening before the Budget Osborne also suffered a significant defeat in the House of Lords when several coalition peers joined Labour and cross-bench Lords to vote against one of the Chancellor's more stealthy efforts to undermine employment rights.
Mr Miliband said Labour was working with Lib Dem and cross-bench peers to scupper the plan in the House of Lords.
Baroness Finlay of Llandaf, a cross-bench peer who will take on the Bill in the House of Lords, added: "This is a really important health measure, particularly for young girls who do not realise the damage they are doing when they are young is going to kill them when they are older.
Ralf Dahrendorf was probably the most outstanding example of the last half-century, a Free Democrat member of the Federal Republic of Germany's Bundestag and a junior minister under Willy Brandt in the 1960s, then a naturalised British citizen and cross-bench member of the House of Lords in the 1990s.