cross-reaction

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cross-reaction

[′krȯs rē′ak·shən]
(immunology)
Reaction between an antibody and a closely related, but not complementary, antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on this understanding, oats should be on the list of cross-reactive grains.
If the now-sensitized individual is exposed subsequently to the same allergen or to an immunologically cross-reactive allergen, then an allergic reaction will be provoked.
Seroconversion was documented in each animal, although 1 animal appeared to have been previously exposed to pH1N1 or a related virus that was able to elicit cross-reactive antibodies.
This new gene constellation for A (H3N2)v viruses and its temporal association with an increase in human cases of A (H3N2)v highlight the need to better understand the risk for human infection with these viruses and the extent to which current seasonal vaccines might elicit cross-reactive antibodies to them.
Rather, the authors suggest using vaccines that induce cross-reactive immune response.
Aflunov was also shown to elicit cross-reactive antibodies against many of the H5 strains that have caused human disease.
We wouldn't have expected that cross-reactive antibodies would be generated against viruses separated by so many years.
As observed in our patient data set, amphetamines are often present in combination with other cross-reactive substances.
At the end of 2009, Adimab and Merrimack entered into a collaboration whereby Adimab used its proprietary yeast-based antibody discovery platform to discover fully human antibodies against human EGFR that were also cross-reactive with the murine and rhesus forms of the antigen.
The conclusion was based on our knowledge, at the time our manuscript was submitted, that in North America no other known phleboviruses of this expanded Uukuniemi group that contains SFTSV and HLV were reported to be cross-reactive with SFTSV.
Essentially we've shown there's a big hole in self-tolerance when it comes to cross-reactive autoantibodies that can attack organ-specific targets," Associate Prof Brink said in a statement.
In the immunologic analyses, prevaccination and postvaccination sera from recipients of seasonal influenza vaccines during 2005-2009 were tested by microneutralization methods for levels of cross-reactive antibody to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus.