cross-reaction

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cross-reaction

[′krȯs rē′ak·shən]
(immunology)
Reaction between an antibody and a closely related, but not complementary, antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cross-reactive antibody response observed after the 1-year booster vaccination suggests that the use of MVA-H5-sfMR is an effective emergency vaccination strategy in case tailor-made vaccines are not yet available in an outbreak situation.
Our research has shown that distilled alcoholic beverages do not contain gluten or cross-reactive antigens.
Seroconversion was documented in each animal, although 1 animal appeared to have been previously exposed to pH1N1 or a related virus that was able to elicit cross-reactive antibodies.
These 24 foods are those most commonly consumed in a gluten-free diet, including foods that tend to be highly cross-reactive with gliadin.
This critical step involving cross-reactive antibodies is then followed by epitope spreading and, ultimately, clinical disease.
There is interest also in the extent to which sensitization to food proteins can be induced by topical or inhalation exposure to the causative allergen or to an immunologically cross-reactive protein.
There is great appeal in the notion that a vaccine approach will provide specificity in its attack and will lack cross-reactive toxicity with chemotherapy Dr.
Inclded in this group are people who test positive because they have other cross-reactive antibodies, unrelated to the AIDS virus.
Antibodies to HTLV-II are significantly cross-reactive to HTLV-I antigens.
The conclusion was based on our knowledge, at the time our manuscript was submitted, that in North America no other known phleboviruses of this expanded Uukuniemi group that contains SFTSV and HLV were reported to be cross-reactive with SFTSV.
Essentially we've shown there's a big hole in self-tolerance when it comes to cross-reactive autoantibodies that can attack organ-specific targets," Associate Prof Brink said in a statement.
Rather, the authors suggest using vaccines that induce cross-reactive immune response.