cross-tolerance


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cross-tolerance

[¦krȯs ′täl·ə·rəns]
(medicine)
Tolerance or resistance to the action of a drug brought about by continued use of another drug of similar pharmacologic action.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The development of tolerance resulting from chronic exposure to one drug also can confer cross-tolerance to one or more other drugs.
The development of cross-tolerance between alcohol and nicotine may contribute to the concurrent use of both drugs in humans.
Cross-tolerance between alcohol and nicotine could also be a mechanism through which either drug enhances the reinforcing properties of the other.
Experimental evidence of cross-tolerance between alcohol and nicotine comes from several lines of research.
Extending these demonstrations of cross-tolerance from animal models to the phenomenon of concurrent alcohol and nicotine dependence in humans, one could hypothesize that people who regularly consume both alcohol and nicotine may develop dependence on both drugs more rapidly than if they consumed only one drug, because the rate of tolerance development would be increased.
Furthermore, cross-tolerance between the behavioral effects of alcohol and nicotine has been seen in experimental studies--that is, animals that develop tolerance to the effects of one drug may also become tolerant to the effect s of the other drug (e.
Conditioning factors that contribute to dependence on one drug may increase dependence on another drug, and it is possible that conditioning factors are involved in the cross-tolerance reported between some actions of alcohol and nicotine.