cross-bench

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cross-bench

Brit a seat in Parliament occupied by a neutral or independent member
References in periodicals archive ?
The transitional Lords would be left with 215 Tories, 160 Labour, 48 Lib-Dems and 148 Crossbenchers.
On Friday a member of Xenophon's eponymous party in the lower house of parliament, Rebekha Sharkie, became the latest crossbencher to withdraw her support for the government on matters of confidence and supply, telling Fairfax Media the prime minister was showing "disrespect to the Australian community" by not standing down the ministers referred to the High Court from their cabinet positions.
But crossbencher Baroness Campbell of Surbiton, who uses a wheelchair, urged ministers to go even further in enhancing bus accessibility for disabled people.
Lady Boothroyd, who sits in the Lords as a Crossbencher, said in a speech: "We have a leaderless and divided opposition who are the despair of those who expect better of the Labour Party.
Lord Digby Jones Business advisor and House of Lords crossbencher DIGBY Jones is probably best known for the seven years he spent as an outspoken director general of the CBI and his time as Minister of State for UK Trade and Investment after being appointed by Gordon Brown.
It makes me glad that I am a crossbencher and that I can stand back and vote the way that I want.
Independent crossbencher Baroness Masham of Ilton asked at question time: "Are the aeroplanes coming from the countries where there are these mosquitoes being sprayed?
Crossbencher Baroness Meacher complained at the way she and others were treated over proposed "fatal" amendments that would kill off the policy.
Former chief of the defence staff and crossbencher Lord Craig of Radley asked if the outcome was "entirely satisfactory" from the Government's point of view.
As Lord Elis-Thomas himself pointed out last week, there is no such thing in the Assembly as a crossbencher.
Crossbencher Baroness Finlay of Llandaff, a former GP and president of the Royal Society of Medicine, said the Government's Health and Social Care Bill did not place enough emphasis on treating those with complex conditions.