crosswind component


Also found in: Acronyms.

crosswind component

crosswind componentclick for a larger image
A component of wind velocity 90° to the track, runway, or any other direction. It is equal to W/V (Wind velocity) × sine A, where A is the angle between W/V and the direction concerned.
References in periodicals archive ?
Odds are that unless you deliberately pick your runway lined up as such, your crosswind component will be less than 90 degrees.
Once you've estimated the crosswind component (it will always be an estimate because no one can tell you for sure what the wind will be the moment you touch down), you have a decision to make.
Fifteen gusting to 25 would be worse, if for no other reason than the lower number usually will be bumping up against that maximum demonstrated crosswind component we discussed earlier.
So, our 20-knot wind blowing 30 degrees off runway heading produces a crosswind component of 3/6 X 20 or, 10 knots.
The aircraft's demonstrated crosswind component was established by the manufacturer at 17 knots.
Winds are 30 degrees from the inbound, so crosswind component is 50 percent of total winds, or 7.
That's all well and good, and using the crosswind component chart is a good way to teach the planning for this maneuver.
You remember the maximum demonstrated crosswind component for this airplane is 17 knots.
Airplanes certified after about 1940 have more than adequate control authority to handle just about any blown landing situation so long as they are within the demonstrated crosswind component.
Of course, by this time, all this talk of a "whopping" 20-knot crosswind got me to thinking: Now would be a really bad time to prang my airplane, with its 17-knot demonstrated crosswind component.
One manufacturer told me they lost a contract because the agency shopping their aircraft required a demonstrated crosswind component of 17 knots; theirs was only 12 knots.
You know that little note in the Cherokee POH that says that the demonstrated crosswind component is 17 knots?