crotchet

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crotchet

1. Music a note having the time value of a quarter of a semibreve
2. Zoology a small notched or hooked process, as in an insect

crotchet

Obsolete term for crocket.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children in the second year (aged 6-7 years, NSW year 1) and third year (aged 7-8 years, NSW school year 2) of the school-age program have covered simple-time rhythms including crotchets, quavers, crotchet rest, semi-quavers and the minim.
The Court of Peeves, Crotchets & Irks resumes its winter assizes with a motion from Jane Williams of Buffalo for a ban on "seems like.
Crotchets in simple time can be represented as 'tea tea' (L).
The hi-hat and ride cymbals usually play constant quavers or crotchets, acting as a form of metronome, although they too are subject to stylistic rhythmic variation.
Or are these angels just notes of music: Semibreves, crotchets, quavers Somehow come alive?
They managed to recruit eight teachers from the state orchestra, where Julie and Philip were still working, and were amazed when 165 people turned up to learn about crotchets and quavers.
The exhibition became a truly phenomenological experience and the vocabulary of the abstract tradition found itself revived in the image of these metal crotchets, platforms, and lengths of rubber motorized and mounted on rollers, which, in the course of their displacements, established an endless number of possible configurations, a multitude of drawings in space.
She reveals few tabloid-style secrets about their marriage (he insisted on twin beds), but she does enlighten those balletomanes who may have been wondering about his working habits, personality, and crotchets (he thought The Red Shoes silly and found Massine's performance particularly annoying).
When converted to crotchets, the andante MMs range from 69 to 104, slightly lower than the range marked 'andante' on a metronome (76 to 108).
Minor changes include somewhat longer music examples, omission of some mentions of other works of Brahms and specifically British comment ('our own Vaughan Williams' becomes 'Vaughan Williams'), along with alteration of spelling to American usage - though the crotchets and quavers survive.
However, every instructor in the course of time builds up his own set of crotchets and pet peeves which he cannot readily forego when looking at someone else's work.