turpentine

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turpentine,

yellow to brown semifluid oleoresin exuded from the sapwood of pines, firs, and other conifers. It is made up of two principal components, an essential oilessential oils,
volatile oils that occur in plants and in general give to the plants their characteristic odors, flavors, or other such properties. Essential oils are found in various parts of the plant body (in the seeds, flowers, bark, or leaves) and are also concentrated in
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 and a type of resinresin,
any of a class of amorphous solids or semisolids. Resins are found in nature and are chiefly of vegetable origin. They are typically light yellow to dark brown in color; tasteless; odorless or faintly aromatic; translucent or transparent; brittle, fracturing like glass;
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 that is called rosinrosin
or colophony,
hard, brittle, translucent resin, obtained as a solid residue from crude turpentine. Usually pale yellow or amber, its color may vary from brownish-black to transparent depending on the nature of the source of the crude turpentine.
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. The essential oil (oil of turpentine) can be separated from the rosin by steam distillation. Commercial turpentine, or turps, is this oil of turpentine. When pure, it is a colorless, transparent, oily liquid with a penetrating odor and a characteristic taste. It contains a large proportion of pinene, a compound from which camphor is manufactured. Turpentine is obtained in large amounts from several species of pines of the SE United States; its physical properties, e.g., boiling point, depend on its source. It is used chiefly as a solvent and drying agent in paints and varnishes.

turpentine

[′tər·pən‚tīn]
(materials)
An essential oil produced by steam distillation of pine woods and from gum turpentine; used as a solvent and a thinner for paints and varnishes.

turpentine, oil of turpentine

A volatile liquid obtained by the distillation of the exudation from certain coniferous trees; once widely used in paint, it is now replaced by solvents obtained from petroleum or coal-tar stocks. Also see wood turpentine.

turpentine

1. any of various viscous oleoresins obtained from various coniferous trees, esp from the longleaf pine, and used as the main source of commercial turpentine
2. a brownish-yellow sticky viscous oleoresin that exudes from the terebinth tree
3. a colourless flammable volatile liquid with a pungent odour, distilled from turpentine oleoresin. It is an essential oil containing a mixture of terpenes and is used as a solvent for paints and in medicine as a rubefacient and expectorant
4. any one of a number of thinners for paints and varnishes, consisting of fractions of petroleum