Cruelty

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Cruelty

See also Brutality.
Achren
mean, spiteful enchantress of Spiral Castle. [Children’s Lit.: The Castle of Llyr]
Allan, Barbara
spurned her dying sweetheart because of a fancied slight. [Br. Balladry: Benét, 78]
Blackbeard
nickname of pirate, Edward Teach (d. 1718). [Am. Hist.: Hart, 84]
Bligh, Captain
tyrannical master of the ship Bounty. [Am. Lit.: Mutiny on the Bounty]
Bumble, Mr.
abusive beadle, mistreats Oliver and other waifs. [Br. Lit.: Oliver Twist]
bull
symbolizes cruelty in Picasso’s Guernica. [Span. Art.: Mercatante, 99]
Cipolla
magician who hypnotizes and brutally humiliates members of the audience. [Ger. Lit.: Mario and the Magician in Benét, 636]
Conchis
his psychological experiments cause repeated emotion-al anguish among his subjects. [Br. Lit.: John Fowles The Magus in Weiss, 279]
Creakle, Mr.
headmaster at Salem House; enjoys whipping boys. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield]
cuscuta
symbol of cruelty. [Flower Symbolism; Jobes, 399]
Diocletian
Roman emperor (284–305); instituted general persecutions of Christians. [Rom. Hist.: EB, 5: 805–807]
Guilbert, Brian de Bois
dissolute and cruel commander of the Knights Templars. [Br. Lit.: Ivanhoe]
Job’s comforters
maliciously torment Job while ostensibly attempting to comfort him. [O.T.: Job]
Legree, Simon
harsh taskmaster; slavetrader. [Am. Lit.: Uncle Tom’s Cabin]
leopard
represents meanness, sin, and the devil. [Animal Symbolism: Mercatante, 56]
Margaret
of Anjou hard, vicious, strong-minded, imperious woman. [Br. Lit.: II Henry VI]
Mezentius
Etrurian king put his subjects to death by binding them to dead men and letting them starve. [Rom. Legend: Benét, 664]
Murdstone, Edward
harsh and cruel husband of widow Copperfield. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield]
painted bird, the
painted by peasants and released, it is rejected and killed by its original flock. [Pol. Tradition: Weiss, 345]
Slout, Mr.
punished Oliver for asking for more gruel. [Br. Lit.: Oliver Twist]
Squeers, Wackford
brutal, abusive pedagogue; starves and maltreats urchins. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
Totenkopfverbande
tough Death’s Head units maintaining concentration camps in Nazi Germany. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer, 375]
Vlad the Impaler
(c. 980–1015) prince of Walachia; called Dracula; ruled barbarously. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 2907]
References in classic literature ?
Be sure they will, said th' Angel; but from Heav'n Hee to his own a Comforter will send, The promise of the Father, who shall dwell His Spirit within them, and the Law of Faith Working through love, upon thir hearts shall write, To guide them in all truth, and also arme With spiritual Armour, able to resist SATANS assaults, and quench his fierie darts What Man can do against them, not affraid, Though to the death, against such cruelties With inward consolations recompenc't, And oft supported so as shall amaze Thir proudest persecuters: for the Spirit Powrd first on his Apostles, whom he sends To evangelize the Nations, then on all Baptiz'd, shall them with wondrous gifts endue To speak all Tongues, and do all Miracles, As did thir Lord before them.
To this we could only repeat what we had said before: he then proposed to abate five thousand of his last demand, assuring us that unless we came to some agreement, there was no torment so cruel but we should suffer it, and talked of nothing but impaling and flaying us alive; the terror of these threatenings was much increased by his domestics, who told us of many of his cruelties.
It is true that he was cruel and unjust to all with whom he came in contact, but to Meriem he reserved his greatest cruelties, his most studied injustices.
Some may wonder how it can happen that Agathocles, and his like, after infinite treacheries and cruelties, should live for long secure in his country, and defend himself from external enemies, and never be conspired against by his own citizens; seeing that many others, by means of cruelty, have never been able even in peaceful times to hold the state, still less in the doubtful times of war.
His knowl- edge of his inability to take vengeance for it made his rage into a dark and stormy specter, that pos- sessed him and made him dream of abominable cruelties.
The children were amazed hear that the more the Quakers were scourged, and imprisoned, and banished, the more did the sect increase, both by the influx of strangers and by converts from among the Puritans, But Grandfather told them that God had put something into the soul of man, which always turned the cruelties of the persecutor to naught.