crusade

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crusade

1. any of the military expeditions undertaken in the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries by the Christian powers of Europe to recapture the Holy Land from the Muslims
2. (formerly) any holy war undertaken on behalf of a religious cause
www.medievalcrusades.com
www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.1k.html
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a thoughtful, useful, and well-ordered discussion that fits into a number of current debates on the nature of crusading and its relation with changes in western European spirituality.
Without centuries of crusading that slowed (but did not stop) the advance of Muslim expansionism, it seems likely to me that Western Europe would have succumbed, just as southeastern Europe did.
In a nutshell: Biography of the crusading Irish journalist who was murdered by mobsters is way too slick and superficially hero-worshiping to do its subject justice.
In short, historians have focused on these issues in terms of Europe's drive east against its Islamic counterparts and the main "isms" behind the crusading movement.
This kind of crusading, advocacy journalism has other problems.
Day-to-day communications between crusading groups must have been nightmarish but chroniclers say little about it.
The other dimension was the increasing call--after the first crusade--for men to follow in the glorious footsteps of their ancestors who had gone crusading before them.
Fighting for the Cross: Crusading to the Holy Land.
By the time he finishes his description of grassroots lay religion at the time of Innocent III, one is ready to ask, how could there not have been a crusading response from the children?
He also locates it in its wider historical context, discussing the religious and political culture of Pairis and the career of Abbot Martin, whose crusading exploits from Acre to Zara the text celebrates.
Painstakingly researched and clearly presented in a chronological narrative, the history of the crusades from the time of Pope Urban II's speech at Clermont in 1095 until the fall of Acre in 1291 is described in terms of the Polish point of view, with attention to crusades against the Balts, the participation of Poles in the Teutonic knights, crusading theology applied to heretics and pagans, and specific crusading activites of Polish aristocracy and church leaders.