crustal plate


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Related to crustal plate: Continental plate, Plate boundaries, Oceanic plate

crustal plate

[′krəst·əl ‚plāt]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Since it only exists in certain places, it can't be the only reason why rigid crustal plates carrying the continents can slide over softer rock below.
Washington, March 23 ( ANI ): Findings of a new study has given insight into what allows plate tectonics - the movement of the Earth's crustal plates - to occur.
The distribution of earthquakes around the globe (earthquakes are Earth's greatest sound generator) delineates narrow active zones that form boundaries between the rigid crustal plates (described by the plate tectonic paradigm); and
Subduction occurs when two crustal plates collide and one dives below the other.
What exactly pushes the vast fragments of the Earth's outer shell around the surface, and when did the crustal plates first break up and start sliding around, warping, tearing and burying each other as they collide?
Similar hot spring oases have been found on other spreading centers -- where molten rock from the mantle rises to create new ocean crust as two adjoining crustal plates move apart.
The researchers suggest the speed of a particular pulse depends on the highly variable viscosity of the Earth's upper mantle, on which the crustal plates rest.
Exploiting these features, Melbourne and a host of international colleagues recently finished the first stage of the largest GPS experiment to date -- an effort to measure the tectonic motion of crustal plates in South and Central America.
If crustal plates on Venus are indeed being moved apart due to the emergence of new crust, comparison with the terrestrial example "the only one we've got," notes Head suggests that there might be signs of the thickening of the two plates' "outer ends," the portions farthest away from the "spreading center.
As for the cause of the massive release, Baker speculates that the venting may be related to episodic rifting at the spreading center, where crustal plates pull apart, creating a gap that is filled by molten basalt.
The process of subduction, by which one of the earth's crustal plates pushes underneath another, is commonly observed in the ocean.
Over the last decade scientists have come to realize that when continents break up and crustal plates collide, the process is far from neat; silvers of continents and pieces of oceanic crust--from volcanic islands to ocean ridges--become plastered onto other continents, making a mosaic of lands that are alien to their surroundings.