crustal plate


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crustal plate

[′krəst·əl ‚plāt]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Nelson says it is probably made up of debris accumulated when the two crustal plates collided head-on, forcing one plate beneath the other.
The strong earthquake that hit Indonesia late Sunday local time apparently focused shallowly on the trench of Java in the Indian Ocean on the boundary of crustal plates, a Japanese scholar specializing in seismology said Monday.
A UCLA scientist has now revealed that the geological phenomenon, which involves the movement of huge crustal plates beneath a planet's surface, also exists on Mars.
It might seem surprising that folding and fracturing occurred on the Moon at all, given that it never had crustal plates, much less plate tectonics.
The earthquakes occurred in a subduction zone where two of Earth's great crustal plates are colliding.
Crustal plates move at rates of only several centimetres per year, on average, but given geological time of millions of years, this movement can displace entire continents over considerable distances.
Washington, March 23 ( ANI ): Findings of a new study has given insight into what allows plate tectonics - the movement of the Earth's crustal plates - to occur.
On a geologically active world these deposits will eventually reach the mantle by the subduction of crustal plates (as happens on Earth) or by some other tectonic process.
The distribution of earthquakes around the globe (earthquakes are Earth's greatest sound generator) delineates narrow active zones that form boundaries between the rigid crustal plates (described by the plate tectonic paradigm); and
Subduction occurs when two crustal plates collide and one dives below the other.
What exactly pushes the vast fragments of the Earth's outer shell around the surface, and when did the crustal plates first break up and start sliding around, warping, tearing and burying each other as they collide?
Similar hot spring oases have been found on other spreading centers -- where molten rock from the mantle rises to create new ocean crust as two adjoining crustal plates move apart.