cryoplanation

cryoplanation

[¦krī·ō·plə′nā·shən]
(geology)
Land erosion at high latitudes or elevations due to processes of intensive frost action.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the alpine area of the Southern Carpathians, the alpine geomorphological landscape is dominated by glacial landforms (glacial cirques, throughs, moraines, erratics and roches moutone) and periglacial features (rockglaciers, talus cones and scree slopes, block fields, rock streams, cryoplanation terraces, patterned ground, solifluction forms etc.
There are, however, several outcrops, where the frost formation including the lateral development of the cryoplanation terrace can be traced, for example in the case of a step-like outcrop on a steep SE slope above the narrow gorge of Penivy brook (Fig.
In few cases, it is possible to recognize traces of sideward development of the cliffs by cryoplanation (see above), the shape of most of the outcrops, however, is strongly influenced by the structure of the rock, particularly the joint systems.
The modern surface of Little Diomede Island is composed of a cryoplanation terrace enclosing a central blockfield and rimmed with tors.
La surface actuelle de l'ile de Petite Diomede se compose d'une terrasse de cryoplanation eatourant un champ central de blocs rocheux et circonscrite par des tors.
The upland may be classified as a cryoplanation surface: a land surface reduced to low relief by processes associated with intensive frost action, supplemented by the actions of running water, moving ice, and other agents (Bates and Jackson, 1983; Allaby and Allaby, 1991).
Evidence for the periglacial environment on Little Diomede Island includes the cryoplanation surface, the blockfield, and the tors.
After marine planation, Little Diomede Island developed a cryoplanation surface because of intense periglacial weathering at least since MIS 3 and possibly since MIS 7/8 (Fig.
During the Pleistocene, periods of loess deposition, weathering, and soil formation during interstadials alternated with periods of cryoplanation and deposition of solifiuction debris in valley sides and bottoms (Wood 1969; Leslie 1973).
The gently sloping interfluves may have been subjected to greater cryoplanation or to greater wind deflation than has occurred on the narrower interfluves of the Glendhu catchment.