cryptogram


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cryptogram

[′krip·tə‚gram]
(communications)
Information written in code or cipher.
References in periodicals archive ?
IDEMIA, as a privileged partner of BGFIBank, is very proud to launch this first VISA card with dynamic cryptogram, which guarantees an optimal level of security for online payments," said Muzaffar Khokhar, President of the Middle East and Africa Region at IDEMIA.
Tokenization, device-specific cryptograms and two-factor authentication are described as key improvements positioning mobile payments appeal to both consumers and vendors.
Chip technology is much more difficult to reproduce, and the dynamic cryptogram created on every transaction makes it extremely difficult for criminals to exploit any false card credentials in-store.
In this case, the cryptanalyst used the cryptogram of the fingerprint used in Figure 7, which is shown in Figure 13(c).
Generating all limited-use keys -- no other entity (including the mobile device) can generate keys that are used to create the cryptogram for the transaction.
In other words: those expecting a linear plot, predictable outcomes, and easy timeline transitions should look elsewhere: Cryptogram is not intended as light entertainment for the sci-fi masses.
EDDIE IZZARD IN THE CRYPTOGRAM After becoming a household name as an "action transvestite" and an irreverent and surreal comedy genius, the one-time Skewen-based stand-up made his first foray into the world of serious acting in 1994, courtesy of Mamet.
The hardware scans transaction details encrypted in a graphical cryptogram, captures and decrypts the coloured cryptogram and the transaction details are presented on the Digipass colour display for user verification.
MasterCard requires the use of a dynamically generated cryptogram with every contactless transaction.
Publisher Norman Basham has developed top-notch puzzle apps including Cryptogram, Crypto-Families and Quotefalls.
The mysterious cryptogram, bound in gold and green brocade paper, reveals the rituals and political leanings of an 18th century secret society in Germany.
The pleasure derived from solving a combinatorial problem is very much like the pleasure of solving a cryptogram or a crossword puzzle, or constructing a good palindrome.