cryptogram

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cryptogram

[′krip·tə‚gram]
(communications)
Information written in code or cipher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poe on Margaret Fuller's genius: "The soul is a cipher, in the sense of a cryptograph .
For example, in The Resisting Reader, Judith Fetterley reads A Farewell to Arms as a resentful cryptograph against women.
toward that of cipher or cryptograph began as early as the fifteenth
The somewhat mysterious looking cryptograph "20+C+M+B+06" is rather easily decipherable.
Among those set to face Imperialism are Kentucky Derby tenth and Preakness seventh Borrego (to be ridden by Tyler Baze and 5-2 in the betting), Britt's Jules (Guy Smith, 6-1) and Round Table Stakes winner Cryptograph (Don Pettinger, 6-1).
Examples are the security dimension of industrial contracts, the definition of technical information security standards and assessing cryptograph processes.
1) a cryptograph in the form of a word whose letters have the numerical values of a word taken as the hidden meaning; (2) the cabalistic method of explaining Hebrew scriptures by means of the cryptographic meaning of the word.
Either the name literally or metaphorically refers to sonic phenomena (Vox and Robinet respectively) or it can be conceived of as an auditory cryptograph, which discloses its meaning upon a reorganization of articulation (Lamiche < la miche; Durateau < du rateau; dur a taux; durat-eau).
The soul is a cypher, in the sense of a cryptograph," wrote the author and amateur cryptographer Edgar Allan Poe, a man whose feverish life--a chronicle of obsessions, depressions, hysterical gestures and determinedly self-destructive behavior--goes a fair way toward proving his point.
IEC's classified system incorporates three functions, which include selective availability, anti-spoofing and the associated cryptograph, all which are required under the Global Positioning System Precise Positioning Service (PPS) requirements.
the difference between Gibson and Defoe is finally Poe--not only because the caverns in Pym mark the moment when, by exploiting the semiotic rupture in Defoe's realist adventure, a certain kind of science fiction was born, but also, and more importantly, because Poe's cryptograph offers a primary source for the denaturalized technological power that Case (and presumably the reader) experiences [in Gibson's Neuromancer] through Case's command of symbols.