cryptographic algorithm

cryptographic algorithm

[¦krip·tə¦graf·ik ′al·gə‚rith·əm]
(communications)
An unchanging set of rules or steps for enciphering and deciphering messages in a cipher system.
References in periodicals archive ?
For resource constrained objects, the selection of the cryptographic algorithm is a key part that can disturb performance[5].
ABSTRACT: A5/1 stream cipher is a type of cryptographic algorithm which is widely used for encryption of the GSM communication.
Due to the increasing need for optimization of area, power, speed and the need for securing the information brings about the demand for real time implementation of simple cryptographic algorithms that will be robust, faster as well as power efficient Light weight cryptographic algorithm is essential for secure communication in the case of wireless sensor node.
The module must pass stringent testing related to the secure design and implementation of a cryptographic module, including cryptographic algorithm implementation, physical security, key management, and role authentication.
The cryptography provided by OpenSSL, which is used by security-enforcing components, was tested using the Cryptographic Algorithm Validation Program (CAVP) established by NIST.
UEKAE works on joint projects together with private sector companies and government authorities by utilizing the TEMPEST, Acoustics, Common Criteria and Cryptographic Algorithm Design and Test Centers and Product Development, Electronic Warfare, Microelectronics and Optoelectronics departments.
NIST establishes cryptographic algorithm standards for the US government.
Unlike traditional ASIC based encryptors, use of FPGAs allow loading of a physical image of the cryptographic algorithm logic into the gate array, thus achieving hardware speeds with software-like flexibility.
Using information about timing, power consumption, and radiation of a device when it executes a cryptographic algorithm, cryptanalysts have been able to break smartcards and other would-be secure tokens.
Based on their observations, the researchers came to the conclusion that MD5 could no longer be considered a secure cryptographic algorithm for use in digital signatures and certificates.
A hash is a cryptographic algorithm that takes data input of any length and produces an output of a fixed length.
Because of this, the IPsec test cases were organized into test directories based upon cryptographic algorithm (e.

Full browser ?