cryptographic key

cryptographic key

[¦krip·tə¦graf·ik ′kē]
(communications)
A sequence of numbers or characters selected by the user of a cipher system to implement a cryptographic algorithm for enciphering and deciphering messages.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lincoln Open Cryptographic Key Management Architecture (LOCKMA)--developed by researchers at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, Mass.
Tokyo, Sept 10, 2010 - (JCN Newswire) - Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, The University of Tokyo (Director: Yasuhiko Arakawa), Fujitsu Laboratories Limited, and NEC Corporation today announced that they have achieved quantum cryptographic key distribution(1) at a world-record distance of 50 km using transmission from a single-photon emitter(2).
According to SSH, the customers of SSH Certifier would be able to use the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 140 for cryptographic key management.
Data is sent through the transistors, where it's scrambled into gibberish for anyone without a cryptographic key.
To generate a cryptographic key, the initiating party uses a procedure like the one described in the sidebar (below), starting with the transmission of a stream of photons.
Airbus Defence and Space, a key player in the cyber security market in Europe, has been awarded three contracts from the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) to provide three additional military aircraft with its world-leading cryptographic key management technology.
According to the company, keyAuthority centralizes the storage and administration of cryptographic key material which can then be automatically distributed on-demand to servers and applications anywhere across the enterprise.
Also, the new releases feature SSL-based secure access, cryptographic key storage and transaction acceleration.
The Diffie-Hellman key agreement mechanism is a well-understood and widely implemented public key technique that facilitates cost-effective cryptographic key agreement across modern distributed electronic networks such as the Internet.
IBM contributed to the specification by providing cryptographic key management capabilities, and the Open Group recently adopted it as a standard.
Below is an example of how a cryptographic key is stored and retrieved in zTrustee:
miniHSM reportedly incorporates a true random number generator and offers secure cryptographic key provisioning and storage, while a built-in real-time clock enables such functionality as time-stamping in addition to the standard functions of encryption, digital signing and authentication.

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