crystal axis

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crystal axis

[¦krist·əl ′ak·səs]
(crystallography)
A reference axis used for the vectoral properties of a crystal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tanzanite is described as a trichroic crystal, radiating three different colours from three different crystal axes.
3] are the number of unit cells along the three crystal axes a, b, and c when the crystallite is assumed to be a parallelepiped.
However, the orientation of measured and calculated AMS tensor agree quite well, indicating a 'normal' relation between crystal axes and AMS tensor.
58 nm, respectively, and thus the intersections between the phonon curves [9] and the dispersion curve for a neutron indicating the most effective incident neutron energy for UCN production with a single phonon creation process, are strongly dependent on the relative angle between the crystal axes and the direction of the neutron incidence.
In each region, the stripes run along one of the two perpendicular crystal axes.
Three-dimensional representations of crystal lattices illustrate crystal axes along the three normal crystal planes.
The motifs are parallel throughout the entire polycrystalline aggregate, and the crystal axes change across grain boundaries.
Next, the indices of refraction and their directions with respect to the crystal axes were looked up for dawsonite, strontianite and aragonite.
In this case, an electron pair would instead have a wave function with d-wave symmetry, resembling a four-leaf clover that has its lobes aligned along the crystal axes.
In the d-wave case, the wave function of the electron pair resembles a four-leaf clover, with lobes aligned along the crystal axes of the material (see illustration below).
The researchers also found that the ratio of distancesbetween molecules lying along two different crystal axes decreased with increasing pressure.
These grains have been fractured along their crystal axes in the same way that quartz grains found near craters and nuclear explosion sites have been fractured when the shock waves from such events ripped through the crust.