crystal phase

crystal phase

[′krist·əl ‚fāz]
(metallurgy)
A crystal structure formed by an alloy over a certain range of values of the relative proportions of its constituents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking first at solution phase then solid phase, they describe such topics as porous polymer structures by synthesis from liquid two-phase systems, flow domains of polymer solutions with a liquid crystal phase, designing the thermophysical behavior of polymers with nanometric inclusions for heat dissipation in electronic devices, developing imide-type polymer fibers containing metal nanoparticles, and thin metal films on polymer substrates.
The crystal phase identification and quantification of the sintered specimens were investigated by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD, Siemens model D500) using CuKa radiation.
They suggested that crystal perfectioning took place during annealing as a decreased chain mobility of the crystal phase was found.
Clinker based on recycled materials, designed to obtain ferrite and silicate phases, was presented a crystal phase is uniformly distributed over the entire surface of the section.
Ten of the synthesized compounds were observed to exhibit a thermotropic liquid crystal phase between 51[degrees]C and 123[degrees]C.
Control of crystal phase switching and orientation by soluble mollusc-shell proteins.
the reflections of the crystal phase with the BCC lattice are already evident at the annealing time of 3 h.
Clariant has obtained a patent for a process for aftertreating an organic pigment comprised of the steps of providing a mixture of an unground or ground organic crude pigment in a carrier and heating the mixture by microwave irradiation to achieve a mass temperature of the mixture, wherein the mass temperature of the mixture reaches 30 to 250[degrees]C, and wherein the carrier is water, an organic solvent or a mixture thereof, wherein the process results in a pigment having a defined morphology and crystal phase.
In case of crystal phase components, direction was selected along elementary cell axes.
The results of EPR studies indicated that light-insensitive samples were probably treated at a higher temperature, which was closer to the melting point, and the amount of glass increased at the expense of the crystal phase.
Many dental ceramics contain a crystal phase and a glass phase based on the silica structure.