crystalline rock


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crystalline rock

[′kris·tə·lən ′räk]
(petrology)
Rock made up of minerals in a clearly crystalline state.
Igneous and metamorphic rock, as opposed to sedimentary rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apatite Fission Track analysis (AFTA) was used in order to understand the time-low-temperature evolution of crystalline rocks from studied area.
1985): Measurements of important parameters determining aqueous phase diffusion rates through crystalline rock matrices.
Once formed in crystalline rock, kinks in the hole, called severe dog legs, cannot be reduced significantly by remedial action.
1993): Study of porosity and migration pathways in crystalline rock by impregnation with 14C-polymethylmethacrylate.
The Kola hole has warned scientists that they have much to learn about interpreting seismic surveys of crystalline rock.
This is an important step in exploring the science needed for utilization of deep boreholes in crystalline rock formations.
The test hole planned for the James' property is meant to be just 8 1/2 inches wide but would go deep below ground, first through the water table and a mile through sediment before hitting the top of a crystalline rock layer.
The subject of the framework contract concerns the provision of expert support for the transparent, credible and justifiable selection of a site for a deep geological repository for radioactive waste in the Czech Republic in such a way as to provide for the optimisation of siting activities by a contractor who has experience in the respective fields of activity acquired during the siting process for a deep geological repository in crystalline rock and concerning which the siting process has reached the licensing phase.
Herrington of the Department of Energy (DOE) last week announced that his agency intends to abandon its controversial search for a suitable site in granite or crystalline rock formations.
The commission unanimously voted to tell the Energy and Environmental Research Center "thanks but no thanks" for the project, which the EERC wanted to conduct on state-owned land to help the federal Department of Energy determine whether crystalline rock 3 miles deep could be used for storing spent nuclear fuels.