crystalline semiconductor

crystalline semiconductor

A semiconductor that uses a silicon or gallium arsenide substrate composed of a single crystal. Its atomic structure is the same throughout the material. Contrast with amorphous semiconductor. See crystalline silicon.
References in periodicals archive ?
This technology has already proven to be remarkably efficient on its first reduction to practice, but has tremendous scope to compete with the very best crystalline semiconductor and thin film technologies on efficiency, while offering the very lowest potential cost for materials and solution processed manufacturing.
Abstract: Printed electronics technologies are being introduced as competitors to crystalline semiconductor technologies in several applications, including logic circuits, photovoltaic ceils and light-emitting diodes.
Chrzan and his colleagues found that when germanium tin nanocrystals were embedded within amorphous silica the nanocrystals formed a bilobed nanostructure that was half crystalline metallic and half crystalline semiconductor.
A Laser Ablation Method for the Synthesis of Crystalline Semiconductor Nanowires', Nature, London, 279:208-211, 1998.
The TFPS modulators offer significant advantages over the existing crystalline semiconductor technologies used today.
Forster Verkehrs and Crystalsol are to produce a new type of flexible photovoltaic film based on a crystalline semiconductor powder.
GigOptix's Electro-Optic polymer technology offers significant advantages over the existing crystalline semiconductor technologies used today.
Solar cell manufacturers need to find a crystalline semiconductor material that exhibits the optimum light absorption range, is a good absorber of solar radiation (silicon, for instance, is weak), has essentially the same lattice spacing of commercially available substrates like Gallium Arsenide or Germanium, and can be deposited seamlessly on those substrates to form a unique artificial crystal with no defects or unwanted impurities, using commercially viable crystal-growth technologies.
Many groups around the world are working on nanowire-type solar cells, most using crystalline semiconductors," said co-author Michael Naughton, a professor of physics at Boston College.
Today's flat-panel technology uses crystalline semiconductors that can't be bent easily.