cubic crystal

cubic crystal

[′kyü·bik ′krist·əl]
(crystallography)
A crystal whose lattice has a unit cell with perpendicular axes of equal length.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, polycrystalline copper metallicis an important material with face centre cubic crystal structure.
In the work [6, 7] with the use of analytical and numerical models of the polycrystal P, Q, F parameter values were got for a large number of metals with cubic crystal lattice.
6] (JCPDS data card number 08-0421) existing in body centered cubic crystal structure (the space group Pm3m) [20].
Steel alloys that operate in high-temperature situations, such as aircraft engines and metal-forming machinery, are often austenitic, meaning they have as their primary base a face-centered cubic crystal.
Chang and coworkers (3) also found that the cubic crystal size of the neat POSS (in the absence of polymer) was quite large (> 20 [micro]m).
At temperatures and pressures found at Earth's surface, pure iron has a structure called a body-centered cubic crystal.
In barware, Cubic Crystal is a full-lead crystal collection with short and tall tumblers, to coordinate with the existing square-based stemware.
The atoms in the filament arranged themselves as a cubic crystal instead of the hexagonal array that typifies bismuth crystals, he says.
53[degrees]) in cubic crystals are sufficiently close to 72[degrees] that five wedge shaped periodic cubic crystal can fill space with some easily detected strain or extra material to fill the missing 7.
argues that the "icosahedral' structures are really "multiple twins of a cubic crystal.
Watson (1904) described entering such a cavity, walking over 6-inch cubes of translucent, bluish violet fluorite, some of them studded with sparkling crystals of calcite or quartz, finding a perfect 12-inch cubic crystal of fluorite, and marveling at the solid coating of galena crystals across the roof of the pocket.
As cubic crystals may be present in extremely cold high-altitude clouds, perhaps accounting for the more unusual halos seen around the sun, making and studying similar crystals in the lab may help enhance models of cloud interaction with sunlight and the atmosphere.