cubic packing

cubic packing

[′kyü·bik ′pak·iŋ]
(crystallography)
The spacing pattern of uniform solid spheres in a clastic sediment or crystal lattice in which the unit cell is a cube.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1611, Johannes Kepler proposed that identical spheres can crowd together no more tightly than oranges do in a grocer's stack, a formation called face-centered cubic packing.
The densest known packing in three dimensions, called the face-centered cubic packing, is familiar to anyone who has seen neat piles of oranges at fruit stands.
Two random packing approaches, pouring and raining, were compared to the face--centered cubic packing (FCC).
Such an arrangement is known as face-centered cubic packing.
In the 19th century, Carl Friedrich Gauss proved that face-centered cubic packing is the densest arrangement in which the centers of the spheres form a regular lattice.