cubic polynomial

cubic polynomial

[′kyü·bik ‚päl·ə′nō·mē·əl]
(mathematics)
A polynomial in which all exponents are no greater than 3.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hermite interpolation function is actually the basic cubic two-point interpolation function, the simplest case of a cubic polynomial with boundary conditions settled (C0 and C1 continuity) as stated by Lehmann et al.
It was found that the DSG is effective to eliminate shear locking for a Kriging-based element with cubic polynomial basis, but not effective for those with quadratic and linear bases.
According to a full cubic polynomial approach 35 measurements are mandatory for estimating the 35 coefficients in the model equation.
The cubic polynomial with real coefficients y = a[x.
Second lane prediction method uses vehicle lateral motion model and the clothoidal cubic polynomial curve road model.
November-April), holiday, and lag holiday (indicating whether 1 of the previous 2 days was a holiday); and product terms between the warm season indicator and the temperature cubic polynomial, humidity cubic polynomial, day of week indicators, holiday indicators, and lag holiday indicators to allow for seasonal interactions in the effects of these confounders.
Their univariate family gives cubic polynomial reproduction but by increasing smoothing stages continuity of their family may or may not be increased.
On the one hand, the described scatter of the values of the coefficients of the cubic polynomial approximation signals that the use of their single representative values is generally not justified.
We emphasize that we are not considering the entire family of planar cubics but are restricting our attention to the subfamily of cubics which have cubic polynomial parameterizations.
From Table 1, it is evident that the actual loss of precision of InSAR geolocation is greater than the approximate cubic polynomial error obtained using the theoretical analysis presented in Section 4.
1 can be rewritten as a cubic polynomial of the compressibility factor, defined as Z = PV/(RT).