cuboctahedron


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cuboctahedron

[‚kyü¦bäk·tə′hē·drən]
(mathematics)
A polyhedron whose faces consist of six equal squares and eight equal equilateral triangles, and which can be formed by cutting the corners off a cube; it is one of the 13 Archimedean solids. Also spelled cubooctahedron.
References in periodicals archive ?
The elementary neighbourhood on such grids is defined as a cuboctahedron (each pixel having twelve nearest neighbours) which is a shape closer to the sphere than the cube.
Joseph DeVincentis suggested the cuboctahedron as a likely shape to use for solid forms--it offers a nice packing of reasonably long words.
At this point, they switched to the PASE module and read about the cuboctahedron.
By using a sequence of elementary moves (moving a vertex along an edge), Morin transforms the cuboctahedron into a curiously shaped figure, which he calls the "central model," with only 12 faces but the same number of vertices as before.
If you start with the 12 vertices of a cuboctahedron, you see many phenomena," Morin adds.
In 1943, the Life magazine published a map projection on a cuboctahedron, This projection was created by R.
However, his patented map projection (Fuller 1946) is based on the cuboctahedron, which has eight triangular faces and six square faces.