cue


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cue

1. (in the theatre, films, music, etc.) anything spoken or done that serves as a signal to an actor, musician, etc., to follow with specific lines or action
2. Psychol the part of any sensory pattern that is identified as the signal for a response
References in classic literature ?
Only when he thought of Miss Mackenzie there fell upon his mind a shadow of regret; that young lady was worthy of better things than plain John Nicholson, still known among schoolmates by the derisive name of 'Fatty'; and he felt, if he could chalk a cue, or stand at ease, with such a careless grace as Alan, he could approach the object of his sentiments with a less crushing sense of inferiority.
Gertrude made him a little bow, and idly knocked the balls about with her cue.
Perhaps I had better say no more, Gertrude, by turning away to put up her cue, signified that that was a point for him to consider; she not intending to trouble herself about it.
Gertrude had never been in Persia, but had seen some Eastern billiard cues in the India museum.
That is your cue to leap over the side as quick as you can move, for at that precise moment this spanking craft is going to capsize.
The leading lady had at length mastered that cue, and gave it out with bell-like clearness.
Jane was the leading woman, she who omitted to give cues.
She gave me the like cue to the gentlewoman of the next house to that which was on fire, and I did my endeavour to go, but by this time the alarm of fire was so great, and so many engines playing, and the street so thronged with people, that I could not get near the house whatever I would do; so I came back again to my governess's, and taking the bundle up into my chamber, I began to examine it.
Young Hawley, an accomplished billiard-player, brought a cool fresh hand to the cue.
With those kind words he laid down the cue and left me.
One night as I was passing a tavern I saw through a lighted window some gentlemen fighting with billiard cues, and saw one of them thrown out of the window.
who preferred fighting with cues or, like Gogol's Lieutenant Pirogov, appealing to the police.