cue

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cue

1. (in the theatre, films, music, etc.) anything spoken or done that serves as a signal to an actor, musician, etc., to follow with specific lines or action
2. Psychol the part of any sensory pattern that is identified as the signal for a response
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, however, some manipulations can lead to a larger positive cuing effect at short SOAs (supposedly bigger capture), which is followed nevertheless by a larger IOR effect at longer SOAs (Milliken, Lupianez, Roberts, & Stevanovski, 2003), indicating that a greater attentional capture is not necessarily followed by a later appearance of IOR.
In Experiment 1, a standard exogenous cuing procedure with a spatially non-informative cue was used.
One way to study reflexive attentional orienting empirically is the cuing paradigm introduced by Posner and colleagues (Posner 1980, Posner & Cohen, 1984).
One set of factors that seems to modulate both the magnitude and time course of exogenous cuing effects concerns the perceptual and response demands of the task.
A second advantage of the head-up display is that it can present conformal information, such as the target cuing described earlier, as long as the head orientation is accurately known and the HMD coordinates of the cue reflect the momentary changes in head orientation, relative to the target environment.
1999) provided such a comparison in a target search task, observing general advantages for the HMD (the benefits of reduced scanning dominated the clutter costs) and, particularly, for using conformal cuing to direct attention to the targets.
1999) that cuing a true target always helps in its detection, the cuing system could potentially lower detection performance levels (Nicoll, 1992).
There is some evidence that observers' reliance on cues is at least partly dependent on two factors: cuing reliability and task difficulty.
Display enhancements to support operators' interaction in these environments include presenting intelligent cuing information to guide attention throughout the scene and increasing the image reality.
As an automated attention-directing device, target cuing is a subset of a larger class of automation systems designed to present, enhance, or filter information available to the human user (Parasuraman, Sheridan, & Wickens, 2000) and which also includes highlighting (Fisher & Tan, 1989) and alarms (Parasuraman, Hancock, & Olofinboba, 1997; Sorkin, 1988).
Auditory 3D cuing benefits visual search performance because auditory 3D displays take advantage of the strengths of the auditory system relative to vision.
Although the greatest benefits of auditory spatial cuing are accrued for peripheral targets, search performance also improves when the targets are located in the central visual field.