culinary steam

culinary steam

[′kəl·ə‚ner·ē ′stēm]
(food engineering)
A steam that can be used for food processing by direct injection into the food being prepared.
References in periodicals archive ?
Culinary steam typically contains additives that prevent corrosion and scaling within boilers, so it is often filtered before coming into contact with food product.
The majority of steam used in the food industry is culinary steam, but there are instances in which pure steam is preferred/required.
Culinary steam is the standard in most food plants.
More economical long-term: Compared to producing pure steam, culinary steam requires less energy and water, meaning lower utility bills in the long run.
Less costly up front: Opting for culinary steam doesn't require initial investment in a steam generator, saving you money up front.
Not as hygienic: While culinary steam is food-safe, it's simply not as hygienic as pure steam that doesn't contain chemicals/additives.
And the team came up with a quite innovative combination of diverse technologies, from beer degassing and culinary steam generation to vacuum stripping and alcohol condensing, which had to work in tandem as an integrated system - a first for a brewery process module.
The system works by culinary steam being injected into a juice concentrate fed to the module from a concentrate tank or pre-mix tank.
Water treatment compounds that are acceptable for use with culinary steam are specified by federal regulation.