Culm

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culm

[kəlm]
(botany)
A jointed and usually hollow grass stem.
The solid stem of certain monocotyledons, such as the sedges.
(mining engineering)
Fine, refuse coal, screened and separated from larger pieces.

Culm

 

the cylindrical, usually hollow stem of a cereal grass. A culm is somewhat distended at the nodes, that is, at the site of leaf attachment. In some cereal grasses, for example, corn, the stalks are solid. The arrangement of the vascular bundles and mechanical tissues along the periphery of the culm imparts great resilience.

References in periodicals archive ?
Bamboo culms with three years old were cut into each internode along their length.
posticata lays its eggs on the sheath of the leaves and its nymphs feed on the surface of the culm (Mendonca et al.
For bamboo forest, however, the harvest consisted only part of the existing timbers (selected cutting of those 4-5 years old plants) while whole bamboo stands still remained, and even for those harvested culms there was a large amount of sequestered C in the underground stems and roots system and leaves in the soils.
Factors found to affect shoot and culm yields included the number of culms of different ages in each stand and the age of culms at harvesting.
They all increase from one year old to five year old culms.
alterniflora were positively correlated in the low marsh consistent with the potential importance of culms as a food source and refuge from predators.
Adventitious shoots were growing from basal culms of harvested plants.
Dan has a 30ft hedge of black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra) and a big clump of Phyllostachys viridiglaucescens, an extremely hardy bamboo with straight green culms and lush foliage, which he uses to hide some unsightly garages next door.
Pearson himself has a 30ft hedge of black bamboo (Phyl-lostachys nigra) and a big clump of Phyllostachys viridiglauces-cens, an extremely hardy bamboo with straight green culms and lush foliage, which he uses to hide some unsightly garages next door.
Pearson himself has a 30ft hedge of black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra) and a big clump of Phyllostachys viridiglaucescens, an extremely hardy bamboo with straight green culms and lush foliage, which he uses to hide some unsightly garages next door.
and co-authors provide a comprehensive reference to the diseases affecting turfgrass, with emphasis on those occuring in North America and Europe, and with exclusion of diseases of inflorescences and culms.