cultigen

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cultigen

[′kəl·tə·jən]
(biology)
A cultivated variety or species of organism for which there is no known wild ancestor. Also known as cultivar.
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Ina similar vein, Koba Jawa's adherence to a distinctive clan nursing recipe (Soya bean and maize) may be explained by its connection with the clan's name ('Soya vines') anda clan plant taboo, as well as the clan's singular status as the only group named after an edible cultigen.
crop: any set of plants cultivated by humans and used for a special purpose; includes all cultigens (but not exclusively)
Remember that AgLoss measures the amount of rice crops that was destroyed; since rice cultigens for planting are normally saved from the previous year's harvest, higher crop losses in the previous year could mean that households do not have sufficient rice seeds to plant a larger field in the current season.
3) suggest the central theme is 'migration' and subsequent transformation, with 'migration' corresponding to the French meaning of circulation, 'the movement of persons, practices, ideas, objects, cultigens and so on.
We know the history of some of these exchanges--the Columbian exchange, for example, that brought New World cultigens to Eurasia.
The chapters on agriculture also describe, in detail, the historical use of a considerable number of cultigens other than rice, both endemic and introduced, including cash crops such as pepper, the adopted cultivation of which (initially by Ma'anyan Dayaks) "instantly put Banjarmasin on seventeenth-century European maps," but also brought early environmental degradation and diseases in its wake.
Generally (so the men say), women are responsible for the storage and maintenance of rice cultigens.
The most reliable method we have for confirming the presence of cultivation at any point in time and space is by obtaining direct radiocarbon determinations on domesticated cereals or other cultigens themselves.
Cultigens from Shizhaishan and Gucheng cultural levels reveal that in addition to rice (Oryza sativa), millet (Seteria italica) and wheat (Triticum sp.
Thus the author shows how Archaic ('pre-Arawak') cultures not only introduced a range of cultigens to the islands, hence behaving in very 'Neolithic' ways, but also coexisted and interacted with pottery-producing groups in Puerto Rico with Central and north-western South American ancestries.
Yet, recent research using comprehensive flotation of soils from Bronze Age burials and settlements, such as Krasnosamarskoe in Russia's Samara Valley, illustrate that communities of the third to second millennia BC in the western forest-steppe region relied primarily on wild plants, rather than cultigens, to augment their pastoralist economies (Anthony et al.
Horticulture was restricted to the north (Figure 3) and based on a limited range of Polynesian cultigens, while pig and fowl, important Polynesian domesticates, were not successfully transferred.