cultural lag


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cultural lag

the hypothesis that social problems and conflicts are due to the failure of social institutions to keep pace with technological change. This hypothesis is based upon the assumption of TECHNOLOGICAL DETERMINISM and is associated with neoevolutionary theories of social change. The term was first used by Ogburn (1964). See also MODERNIZATION, TECHNOLOGY, FUNCTIONALISM, NEOEVOLUTIONISM.
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I want to draw your attention today to what I perceive as a cultural lag in thinking about the objectives of economic policy.
These are the labor surplus model, with its close association with dependency theory, on the one hand, and the cultural lag model on the other hand.
Regarding their earlier data, Crabb and Bielawski (1994) suggested that the disconnect between unchanging representations in children's books and changing labor patterns may have been symptomatic of a cultural lag (Ogburn, 1964).
To address and mitigate the impact of cultural lag, new technology must be introduced deliberately as part of a carefully planned series of strategies that recognize the issues, concerns and interests of those who will be expected to use it as well as, in some cases, the interest and sensitivities of those upon whom the technology will be applied.
The first of these, cultural lag, is diminishing as an obstacle to our winning legal equality.
In the first of these essays, "Creative and Cultural Lag," William Maxwell makes a compelling case that in spite of Ellison's overt latter-day opposition to radical political ideologies, his 10-year commitment to Communism in the 1930s and early 40s permeates much of the ethos of Invisible Man.
Implicit in FitzGerald's analysis is a cultural lag model whereby inexorable socio-economic processes of some force cause Irish to retreat steadily from the Dublin Pale and the Ulster Plantation ever westwards to its last stand in a western Gaeltacht or to its inevitable extinction even there.
The accompanying concept of an authoritarian cultural lag holds that changing from an authoritarian to a democratic one will be a lengthy process.
Consistency, Resistance to Change, and Cultural Lag in Images of the Adaptive Adult.
Fogel's emphasis on technologically-driven social change and cultural lag in institutions is reminiscent of the formative period of naturalistic social theory from Lewis Henry Morgan to William Fielding Ogburn.
People need to use and rely on the systems but sometimes cultural lag gets in the way.
These problems manifest themselves as Kenneth Boulding's (1966) pathologies of intellectual productivity: spurious saliency, unproductive emulation, and cultural lag.

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