cumulate

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Related to cumulation: defeat, reluctant

cumulate

[′kyü·myə‚lāt]
(petrology)
Any igneous rock formed by the accumulation of crystals settling out of a magma.
References in periodicals archive ?
The L subfactor calculation was based on the overland-flow length algorithms through iterative FCL slope-length cumulation and maximum downhill slope angle (Hickey 2000; Van Remortel et al.
better address the issues of cumulation, (129) vulnerability, (130) and
This is pretty much a one-off rabbit out of the hat; hence no cumulation of this year's figure over the next four.
It wasn't so much the defeat in itself, but rather the cumulation of events.
Specifically, how did path dependency--the difficulty of altering the trajectory put in place by the cumulation of early actions--combine with immediate circumstances, including Obama's choice of advisors and the pressure of cumulating financial disequilibria, to produce continuity where change was expected?
The legislature has chosen to continue in the choice of sanctioning concurrent offenses mainly for the juridical cumulation considered by the doctrine and jurisprudence as being the "most rational" (2).
Had tightening measures been delayed until economic recovery was well under way, cumulation output on the period 2011-21 would have been significantly higher, and the unemployment rate would have been expected to rise no higher than 7% over the next decade.
However, the cumulation of daily demonstrations organised by different sectors of society and the repeated sit-ins held by Copts over different sectarian events, together with the regular Friday demonstrations in Tahrir Square to raise public demands or oppose some governmental stands, seemed too much for SCAF to tolerate.
Jenny has been based at Highgreen, near Hexham, for the past 12 months and the opening this Saturday of Cumulation - an exhibition of work inspired by the flora and fauna of her surroundings - marks the end of her residency.
This brings us to the question of cumulation over time and across subject: Assuming that an application reciting a subject matter agenda, but not conditioned on the convention being so limited, counts; and assuming that subsequent invalid applications do not count as repealing such an application for a convention; and assuming that such applications for general conventions could state any of a number of subject matter interests, is there any reason to think that we should not count even fairly old convention applications on diverse subjects in the total needed to reach the magic number of thirty-four?
Although the ending promises hope, the slowly unfolding stories conveyed in the cumulation of the letters make the book a restrained elegy, a remarkable achievement for its Australian schoolgirl author.