curate


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curate

1. a clergyman appointed to assist a parish priest
2. a clergyman who has the charge of a parish (curate-in-charge)
References in periodicals archive ?
Sue Fairhurst (new |priest) - curate of St James, Old Milverton and St Mary Magdalene, Lillington in Warwick and Leamington Deanery.
It is lovely to have such a special object to enhance our worship," says rector, Richard Steel, "and it is great that it has been funded by money raised from those who knew Tom, including two former curates who have gone on to become Bishops.
The Create and Curate event continues today from 11am to 4pm, with the families work on display tomorrow and Sunday.
Doctors know better than curates or judges on this.
But who will collect, curate, and preserve the artifacts of our uses of information technologies?
OPERA singer Neill Archer has taken a pounds 31,000-a-year pay cut to become a Church of England curate.
This involves an understanding of abandonment strategies and occupational curate and discard behaviour, as these can deplete assemblages and distort the systemic integrity of residual material (Schiffer 1972; 1976; 1985; Cameron & Tomka 1993).
Users can curate, annotate, provide context, share with their colleagues and teams, and collaborate inside of documents and videos.
Officers executed warrants at a property on The Coppice and two houses in nearby Curate Road at around 4pm.