cure

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cure

1. a return to health, esp after specific treatment
2. any course of medical therapy, esp one proved effective in combating a disease
3. the spiritual and pastoral charge of a parish

cure

[kyu̇r]
(chemistry)
To change the properties of a resin material by chemical polycondensation or addition reactions.
(chemical engineering)
(engineering)
A process by which concrete is kept moist for its first week or month to provide enough water for the cement to harden. Also known as mature.

cure

1. To change the physical properties of an adhesive or sealant by chemical reaction, which may be condensation, polymerization, or vulcanization; usually accomplished by the action of heat and catalyst, alone or in combination, with or without pressure.
2. For concrete, see curing.
3. To provide conditions conducive to the hydration process of stucco or portland cement.
4. To provide a sufficient quantity of water and to maintain the proper temperature within a plaster to ensure cement hydration.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a common molding defect, caused by the expansion of the cured rubber on opening the mold, resulting in a rupture or tearing at the part line.
Once cured, the mold halves are mounted together and prepared for the molding operation by putting a bead of hot melt glue around the joint to keep the halves from separating or shifting.
DDSA (dodecenyl succinic anhydride) for producing tougher, more flexible cured polymers.
In principal, any sodium silicate binder can be cured entirely by dehydration, but [CO.
Cured resin has a Tg of 599 F and shows a 1% weight loss in air (post-cured) at 815 F.
AEM dipolymer compounds are peroxide cured and do not require a post-cure.
Cured rubber compounds used in down-hole applications are engineered materials especially designed for this application.
DDSA (dodecenyl succinic anhydride) is offered for producing tougher, more flexible cured polymers; Succinic anhydride (SAA) is recommended for applications where a dibasic acid anhydride is desired; and HHPA (hexahydrophthalic anhydride) hardener is also recommended for curing epoxies.
Besides looking for ways to reuse cured thermosets, industry is also designing composites to be more easily recyclable.
After about ten minutes, it is fully cured and, after being allowed to cool briefly, is removed from the mold.
Armocure is said to help produce castings that are tough, flexible, resistant to freeze-thaw cycles and that can be cured at relatively low temperatures.