coracle

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coracle

a small roundish boat made of waterproofed hides stretched over a wicker frame
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Julius Caesar mentions British skin-lined boats (though it's unclear whether he meant coracles or currachs, which were rather larger), as does Pliny.
The filmed project will culminate in a 150-mile journey in currachs - traditional skin covered boats used by the Celtic saints, fishermen and traders - down the River Wye, along the Severn Estuary and around the South Wales coast to St Donats Arts Centre at Atlantic College next year.
Author: Mark Patrick HedermanPublished by: Currach PressISBN: 1-85607-902-3Price: GBP10.
Watch a Shropshire boat builder create a coracle and a leather-skinned currach - a prehistoric sea-going boat.
Timothy Joyce, in Celtic Christianity: A Sacred Tradition, a Vision of Hope (Orbis), also emphasizes this risky, otherworldly dimension: "Going off to sea in a currach (small canvas boat), setting oneself adrift without oars and letting the wind determine one's destination was an expression of this wandering and self-abandonment that characterized `white martyrdom.
When we arrived by currach, a traditional boat made of laths and tarred canvas, the island presented a melancholy air.
Sheehy better-known as Domhnall Mac Sithigh, was no stranger to the sea and had spent the last four summers making the trip by Currach from James' Gate on the River Liffey to La Coruna in Northern Spain - the start of the famous Camino trail.
Working with Valley and Vale Community Arts and Arts Alive Wales, the artists and visionaries are running a currach (traditional skin covered boat) building workshop "From the Mountains to the Sea" with renowned designer and boat builder, Rory Macphee.
ARTHUR FLYNN The Story of Irish Film Currach Press; Dufour Editions, Inc.
And far from being hungry, if the television castaways get fed up rustling up tasty fish or shellfish, they can always go down to the Irish pub, The Currach, where Louise helps out, and down a Guinness and a juicy steak with chips.
the only kind of boat in use is a currach, a canoe of wicker framework and canvas covering".