currant


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currant,

northern shrub of the family Saxifragaceae (saxifragesaxifrage
, common name for several members of the Saxifragaceae, a family of widely varying herbs, shrubs, and small trees of cosmopolitan distribution. They are found especially in north temperate zones and include many arctic and alpine species.
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 family), of the same genus (Ribes) as the gooseberry bush. The tart berries of the currant may be black, white, or red; the white gooseberry becomes purple when mature. Both, especially the larger European species, are eaten fresh and also used in preserves, sauces, and pies. Because the plants act as a host to blister rustrust,
in botany, name for various parasitic fungi of the order Uredinales and for the diseases of plants that they cause. Rusts form reddish patches of spores on the host plant. About 7,000 species are known.
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, their cultivation in America is discouraged, and in regions of infection the wild species are eradicated. Native Americans used dried currants in making pemmicanpemmican
, a travel food of the Native North American. Slices of lean venison or buffalo meat were sun dried, pounded to a paste, and packed with melted fat in rawhide bags. Dried currants or wild berries were sometimes included in the paste.
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, but the "dried currant" of commerce is a small raisin. Indian currant is a name for a West Coast species and for the coralberry of the honeysuckle family. Native species of gooseberry are sometimes cultivated in gardens. Currant is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Saxifragaceae.
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currant
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currant

currant

A shrub that grows two to four feet off the ground and has leaves similar to a maple leaf, with toothed edges. It produces black currant berries that grow in clusters of four to six. Related to gooseberries. High in antioxidants, vitamin C, electrolytes, used to treat kidney disorders, menstrual and menopause problems. Contains gammalinolenic acid (GLA), proven to help PMS. Anthocynins scavenge free radicals to help anti-aging. Used for diabetes, heart, cancer, blood cleansing, digestive aid. Tea used for rheumatism.

currant

[′kər·ənt]
(botany)
A shrubby, deciduous plant of the genus Ribes in the order Rosales; the edible fruit, a berry, is borne in clusters on the plant.

currant

symbol of infidelity. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 398]

currant

1. any of several mainly N temperate shrubs of the genus Ribes, esp R. rubrum (redcurrant) and R. nigrum (blackcurrant): family Grossulariaceae
2. the small acid fruit of any of these plants
References in classic literature ?
You went and gave Diana currant wine instead of raspberry cordial.
Well, this story will be a nice handle for those folks who are so down on me for making currant wine, although I haven't made any for three years ever since I found out that the minister didn't approve.
Now what sort of person can that be," I asked myself, shaking my head, as I contemplated the changes before me, "who could put a rockery among vegetables and currant bushes?
Soon her eye fell on a little glass box that was lying under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small cake, on which the words `EAT ME' were beautifully marked in currants.
Why, I could name ye a dozen whose bones lie in the Greenland seas above," he pointed northwards, "or where the currants may have drifted them.
On the 26th of May, the travellers encamped at Laramie's Fork, a clear and beautiful stream, rising in the west-southwest, maintaining an average width of twenty yards, and winding through broad meadows abounding in currants and gooseberries, and adorned with groves and clumps of trees.
I've been forced t' have Nancy in, upo' 'count as Hetty must gether the red currants to-night; the fruit allays ripens so contrairy, just when every hand's wanted.
The child 'ull run in if she's told, an' I know Hetty's lettin' her eat too many currants.
At an early hour one day, he encamped in a narrow valley on the banks of a beautifully clear but rushy pool; surrounded by thickets bearing abundance of wild cherries, currants, and yellow and purple gooseberries.
Prices, I'll admit, are what nobody can know the merits of; and the sudden falls after you've bought in currants, which are a goods that will not keep-- I've never; myself seen into the ins and outs there; which is a rebuke to human pride.
In the kitchen - "Make that pie a large one, Rose; I daresay the boys'll be hungry; and don't put so much pepper in, they'll not like it, I'm sure" - or, "Rose, don't put so many spices in the pudding, Gilbert likes it plain," - or, "Mind you put plenty of currants in the cake, Fergus liked plenty.
Lavish profusion is in the shops: particularly in the articles of currants, raisins, spices, candied peel, and moist sugar.