current


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current

1. a mass of air, body of water, etc., that has a steady flow in a particular direction
2. the rate of flow of such a mass
3. Physics
a. a flow of electric charge through a conductor
b. the rate of flow of this charge. It is measured in amperes

Current

 

(i), a scalar quantity characterizing the time rate of flow of electric charge. It is equal to the ratio of the charge Δq transported through the cross section of a conductor in the time Δt to the time: i = Δqt. The unit of current is the ampere. Current is measured by means of ammeters.

current

[′kər·ənt]
(electricity)
The net transfer of electric charge per unit time; a specialization of the physics definition. Also known as electric current.
(physics)
The rate of flow of any conserved, indestructible quantity across a surface per unit time.

current

The flow of electricity in a circuit; the unit of measurement is the ampere.

current

i. A pilot qualified on a type of aircraft and presently cleared to fly without any additional checks.
ii. A civil aircraft that is on active register and in routine operation.

current

(electronics)
The quantity of charge per unit time, measured in Amperes (Amps, A). By historical convention, the sign of current is positive for currents flowing from positive to negative potential, but experience indicates that electrons are negatively charged and flow in the opposite direction.

current

(1) The flow of electrons through a circuit. Measured in "amperes." See amp and voltage.

(2) The latest version or model.

(3) (Current) An earlier Windows PIM from IBM that included a calendar, address book, phone dialer, outliner, word processor and Gantt charts for project tracking. It was revised by its developer, Jensen-Jones Inc., Red Bank, NJ, into a new package called Commence.
References in classic literature ?
Once more the trick river reversed its current, but this time the Scarecrow was on guard and used the pole to push the raft toward a big rock which lay in the water.
After passing the wall of water the current did not change or flow backward any more but continued to sweep them steadily forward.
This eddy carried me about a league on my way back again, directly towards the island, but about two leagues more to the northward than the current which carried me away at first; so that when I came near the island, I found myself open to the northern shore of it, that is to say, the other end of the island, opposite to that which I went out from.
When I had made something more than a league of way by the help of this current or eddy, I found it was spent, and served me no further.
This very current was partly responsible for that name.
And she's a good ship, too," he added regretfully, after altering the course, this time making more allowance than ever for the westerly current.
The boat was soon in the current of the river again, and soon they would be at Tofton.
Heroically she clung to the heavy iron links, almost dragged from the canoe by the strain of the current upon her craft.
I could not imagine what might cause this strong lateral flow, for the main channel of the river was plainly visible to me from where I sat, and I could see the rippling junction of it and the mysterious current which had aroused my curiosity.
They floated along with the current throughout the night, taking turns to watch and steer.
This is one of the characteristics of the middle and lower part of the Missouri; but still more so of the Mississippi, whose rapid current traverses a succession of latitudes so as in a few days to float the voyager almost from the frozen regions to the tropics.
Crooks and one of his companions were thrown amidst roaring breakers and a whirling current, but succeeded, by strong swimming, to reach the shore.