curvature effect

curvature effect

[′kər·və·chər i′fekt]
(electronics)
Generally, the condition in which the dielectric strength of a liquid or vacuum separating two electrodes is higher for electrodes of smaller radius of curvature.
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When plastic shrinkage is taken into account (that is, an air gap is present), two new dimensionless groups appear, namely, the air gap curvature effect ([[Pi].
Consequently, the mold and plastic curvature effects can be ignored.
Figure 9 shows that for small curvature effect the dimensionless powder-end times for the plane and sphere using the differential model converge to the same value, whereas the larger the curvature effect the larger the deviation between the sphere and the plane predictions.
9, shows that for small curvature the powder-end times for the plane and sphere using the differential model converge to the same value, whereas the larger the curvature effect the larger the deviation between the sphere and the plane predictions.
Finally, neglecting the curvature effect both for the mold and the plastic layer constitutes the third assumption of the lumped parameter model.
Furthermore, since the mold thickness is generally much smaller than the mold radius the curvature effects are negligible and the geometry can be approximated as planar (see Fig.
The 60 papers examine such topics as cold compressed baryonic matter with hidden local symmetry and holography, topological and curvature effects in a multi-fermion interaction model, continuum superpartners from supersymmetric unparticles, new regularization in extra dimensional model and renormalization group flow of the cosmological constant, and critical behaviors of sigma-mode and pion in holographic superconductors.
The RAT theory complements the conventional turbulence mechanics by accounting for the curvature effects of the velocity fluctuation streamlines on the formation of the average flow properties.
The suggested modified Ekman model explains the observed deviations from the point of view of the turbulence mechanics in Heinloo (2004) accounting for the curvature effects of the velocity fluctuation streamlines on the formation of the average flow properties.
Examples include his insights on magnetic island healing, curvature effects on island evolution, and convective instability of drift waves.