cusp


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cusp

1. Dentistry any of the small elevations on the grinding or chewing surface of a tooth
2. Anatomy any of the triangular flaps of a heart valve
3. Geometry a point at which two arcs of a curve intersect and at which the two tangents are coincident
4. Architect a carving at the meeting place of two arcs
5. Astronomy either of the points of a crescent moon or of a satellite or inferior planet in a similar phase
6. Astrology any division between houses or signs of the zodiac

cusp

Either of the tapering points of the crescent phase of the Moon, Venus, or Mercury.

Cusp

The intersection of two arcs or foliations in a tracery; the figure formed by the intersection of tracery arcs or foliations.

Cusp

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

In astrology, cusp refers to two different but related divisions. First, a cusp is the dividing line separating a sign from its preceding sign. For example, someone born just prior to the Sun’s movement out of Cancer and into Leo is said to be “on the cusp of Leo” or “on the Cancer-Leo cusp.” Such an individual is said to manifest traits of both signs.

Second, the cusp is the dividing line separating a house from the preceding house. For example, if an individual’s seventh house begins at 10° Aries and ends at 13° Taurus, the person’s seventh house cusp is at 10° Aries. Planets located at end of one house so that they are very close (usually within 5°) to the next house are said to influence the affairs of both houses. Thus, to continue using the previous example, a natal Venus located at 8° Aries in the sixth house would exert—over and above its influence in the sixth house—an influence in the seventh house because it is only 2° away from the seventh-house cusp.

Sources:

Brau, Jean-Louis, Helen Weaver, and Allan Edmands. Larousse Encyclopedia of Astrology. New York: New American Library, 1980.
Leo, Alan. The Complete Dictionary of Astrology. Rochester, VT: Destiny Books, 1989.

cusp

[kəsp]
(anatomy)
A pointed or rounded projection on the masticating surface of a tooth.
One of the flaps of a heart valve.
(architecture)
A pointed projection or peak created by the intersection of two arcs.
(geology)
One of a series of low, crescent-shaped mounds of beach material separated by smoothly curved, shallow troughs spaced at more or less regular intervals along and generally perpendicular to the beach face. Also known as beach cusp.
(geophysics)
Any of the funnel-shaped regions in the magnetosphere extending from the front magnetopause to the polar ionosphere, and filled with solar wind plasma.
(mathematics)
A singular point of a curve at which the limits of the tangents of the portions of the curve on either side of the point coincide. Also known as spinode.

cusp

types of cusps
1. The intersection of two arcs or foliations in a tracery.
2. The figure formed by the intersection of tracery arcs. Also see foil.
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Realizing there was an opportunity at SXSW for programming specifically catered to women, CUSP by Neiman Marcus wanted to create the ultimate destination for women to meet up with girlfriends, listen to trailblazing women talk about their success, and get loud with the hottest emerging musicians from Atlantic Records," said Wanda Gierhart, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of Neiman Marcus Group, LTD Inc.
1%, respectively) of the valves from each age group showed evidence of cusp tears.
The variable occurrence of ventral cusps and leg spines in Trachelinae, previously regarded as key structures in the definition of the group, requires that other morphological characters need to be investigated to evaluate the monophyly of the group and its composite genera.
Dental anomalies in the primary dentition associated with talon cusp of non-cleft and non-syndrome patients, are rare.
Bosch and Fuqua (2001) proposed that a target behavior would be a behavioral cusp if it met one or more of the following criteria: (1) the behavior results in access to new reinforcers, contingencies, and environments; (2) the behavior is socially valid; (3) generativeness--that behavior allows for the generation of a wide number of behaviors; (4) the behavior competes with inappropriate responses; (5) and/or the behavior affects a large number of people.
Lateral and posterior teeth are lower crowned with a distally inclined cusp.
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Among the titles profiled were lesbian activist Joan Nestle's The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader, which arrived on the cusp of a widespread reevaluation and embrace of butch and femme identities, and Essex Hemphill's Ceremonies, a now-classic work exploring Hemphill's own life as a black gay HIV-positive man.
There is a well defined posterobuccal ledge which descends from the most posterior serration, ml The cusp formula is 7:4-5.
There is a part of everyone's Sunsign chart called the Love Cusp which, like a compass, points to the types of places and situations where we might encounter love.
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