cut glass


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Related to cut glass: glass cutter

cut glass

a. glass, esp bowls, vases, etc., decorated by facet-cutting or grinding
b. (as modifier): a cut-glass vase

Cut glass

A glass which has been decorated by grinding figures or patterns on its surface by abrasive means, followed by polishing it.

cut glass

[¦kət ¦glas]
(materials)
Flint glass ornamented with patterns cut into its surface.

cut glass

A glass which has been decorated by grinding figures or patterns on its surface by abrasive means, followed by polishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cut glass work of the 1920s and 1930s owes its design rootes to Art Deco, a legacy that continues after the Second World War into the work being produced by a new group of designers who were empowered by the hope of a new society with new beginnings.
13), of about 1745, hears the royal arms and describes him as a "GLASS CUTTER' who 'makes & sells all Sorts of Curious Cut Glass, such as Cruets, Castors, Salts .
If they are performed too rapidly, the movement can jar the cut glass panels out of precise alignment, degrading quality.
Because the duty related to weight, it became advantageous for heavier, cut glass to be produced in Ireland; so although all types of glass were made there, the term 'Irish glass' came to be synonymous with cut glass.
Services include replacement of any glass in the vehicle, chip repairs, custom cut glass, antique and motor home glass.
This collection from Matalan includes wishbone lamp pounds 30, antique column lamp pounds 30, flower lamp pounds 30, cut glass round antique lamp pounds 45, and glamour ball lamp pounds 35.
The building has examples of Regency furniture and three of the finest Georgian chandeliers in Europe - each containing 20,000 pieces of cut glass crystal.
One group of centerpieces features sculpted Durastone bases that hold removable and washable cut glass bowls for flowers, food or other decorative objects.
In ``Millennium,'' protagonist Frank Black (played by Lance Henriksen) has a face so intense it could cut glass.
The Pairpoint Corporation employed more than 300 persons in 1906 making a variety of blown and molded glasswares and silver plated Britannia metal wares from pragmatic to ornamental presentation pieces including tea sets, prize cups, flatware and other cut glass articles.
The cut glass celery vase shown here is a case in point.