cut off


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Related to cut off: Cut Off Date

cut off

1. a device to terminate the flow of a fluid in a pipe or duct
2. the remnant of metal, plastic, etc., left after parts have been machined or trimmed
3. Electronics
a. the value of voltage, frequency, etc., below or above which an electronic device cannot function efficiently
b. (as modifier): cutoff voltage
4. Geography a channel cutting across the neck of a meander, which leaves an oxbow lake
5. another name for oxbow (the lake)
References in classic literature ?
The veteran trappers and voyageurs of Lisa's party shook their heads as their comrades set out, and took leave of them as of doomed men; and even Lisa himself gave it as his opinion, after the travellers had departed, they would never reach the shores of the Pacific, but would either perish with hunger in the wilderness, or be cut off by the savages.
At these words he rose, and put off his frock-coat and cravat, went towards a table on which lay his son's toilet articles, lathered his face, took a razor, and, with a firm hand, cut off the compromising whiskers.
The same sort of process has perhaps been undergone by wiser men, when they have been cut off from faith and love--only, instead of a loom and a heap of guineas, they have had some erudite research, some ingenious project, or some well-knit theory.
The executioner's argument was, that you couldn't cut off a head unless there was a body to cut it off from: that he had never had to do such a thing before, and he wasn't going to begin at HIS time of life.
I paced the rooms and cried aloud when I thought of how I was cut off from her, of all that might hap- pen to her in my absence.
The oracle assured him that his enterprise would be completely successful, provided no rain should fall before he had passed through the defile; but should it rain, his band would be utterly cut off.
I had my hair cut off and sold because I couldn't have lived through Christmas without giving you a present.
And I add," said Fouquet, "that the concierge of the Palais would not have his head cut off, for he would receive of me my horses to effect his escape, and five hundred thousand livres wherewith to live comfortably in England: I add, that this lady, my friend, would give him nothing but the horses and the money.