cut point


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cut point

[′kət ‚pȯint]
(chemical engineering)
The boiling-temperature division between cuts of a crude oil or base stock.
(mathematics)
A point in a component of a graph whose removal disconnects that component. Also known as articulation point.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this illustrative application, the physicians who are above the cut point are labeled "above threshold" and the remaining labeled "below threshold.
Number 5,000, a SuperFine Air Classifier, is a quantum leap in technology with cut points as low as 3 micron it is a cutting edge, ultra-high efficiency classifier, the company said.
2 vs no mTBI diagnosis) for reporting "clinical levels" of PTSD symptoms, but this was defined as a cut point [greater than or equal to] 28 on the PCL, which was not crossvalidated for clinical PTSD [15].
Major finding: At one illustrative cut point, the score would have reduced the number of biopsies by 41%, with a negative predictive value of 97%.
This score falls above the cut point corresponding to 100% sensitivity, "so if that was the clinician's practice, that patient would have massive hemorrhage preparations," she said.
The strength of the association with hs-CRP depended on the cut points selected for analysis.
Screening requires the use of cut points to identify individuals with dyslipidemia.
provides an unambiguous measure of the cut point of the filter This is important in critical applications such as pharmaceutical processing or air and oil filters in military vehicles.
The last BRAC commission in 1995 threatened to cut Point Mugu, which was eventually consolidated into the Naval Base Ventura County.
This semi-free vortex style air classifier achieves high classification performance between 80-200 microns cut point
At 4 liters per minute, the cut point of the standard cyclone is 2.
An integral feed conveyor and hugger belt assembly guides the product to the cut point.