cut

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cut

1. Botany incised or divided
2. Veterinary science gelded or castrated
3. Economics a decrease in government finance in a particular department or area, usually leading to a reduction of services, staff numbers, etc.
4. short for power cut
5. Chiefly US and Canadian a quantity of timber cut during a specific time or operation
6. Sport the spin of a cut ball
7. Cricket a stroke made with the bat in a roughly horizontal position
8. Films an immediate transition from one shot to the next, brought about by splicing the two shots together
9. Chem a fraction obtained in distillation, as in oil refining
10. the metal removed in a single pass of a machine tool
11. 
a. the shape of the teeth of a file
b. their coarseness or fineness
12. Brit a stretch of water, esp a canal
13. make the cut Golf to better or equal the required score after two rounds in a strokeplay tournament, thus avoiding elimination from the final two rounds
14. miss the cut Golf to achieve a greater score after the first two rounds of a strokeplay tournament than that required to play in the remaining two rounds

Cut

 

a relief printing plate used for reproducing illustrations. Depending on the type of original being reproduced, either a linecut or halftone is made. Linecuts are made from an original consisting of lines, strokes, and solid backgrounds of uniform density (pen-and-ink drawings, engraved prints, sketches); halftones are made from an image with varying densities (photographs, watercolors, or oil paintings).

Cuts are made with wood, linoleum, zinc, brass, copper, or plastic. In making zinc cuts, which are the most widely used, the original is first photographed; using photomechanical methods, it is then transferred onto a zinc plate with a light-sensitive coating, after which the areas between the surfaces to be printed are deepened by chemical or electrochemical etching. Copper cuts are made by hand engraving or etching in a solution of ferric chloride. There is also a quick method, known as single-process etching, for making magnesium and zinc cuts with etching machines. Cuts are also made on electroengraving machines. One cut will print 40,000–50,000 copies.

REFERENCES

Geodakov, A. I. Tsinkografiia. Moscow, 1962.
Geodakov, A. I. Proizvodstvo klishe. Moscow, 1972.

cut

[kət]
(biochemistry)
A double-strand incision in a duplex deoxyribonucleic acid molecule.
(chemical engineering)
A fraction obtained by a separation process.
(crystallography)
A section of a crystal having two parallel major surfaces; cuts are specified by their orientation with respect to the axes of the natural crystal, such as X cut, Y cut, BT cut, and AT cut.
(graphic arts)
A photoengraving used in letterpress printing.
(lapidary)
The style in which a gem is cut, such as brilliant cut, single cut, or rose cut.
(mathematics)
A subset of a given set whose removal from the original set leaves a set that is not connected.
(metallurgy)
(mining engineering)
To intersect a vein or a working.
To excavate coal.
To shear one side of an entry or a crosscut by digging out the coal from floor to roof with a pick.
(cell and molecular biology)
A double-strand incision in a duplex deoxyribonucleic acid molecule.
(nucleonics)
The fraction that is removed as product or advanced to the next separative element in an isotope separation process.
(textiles)
The number of needles per inch in the cylinder or needle bed in a knitting frame.

cut

1. Excavated material.
2. The void resulting from the excavation of material.
3. The depth to which material is to be excavated to bring the surface to a predetermined grade.
4. In the theater, a long slot across the stage floor for the introduction or removal of scenery.

cut

i. To switch off an aircraft engine.
ii. To cut the gun. To close the throttle of an engine.
iii. In air navigation, the intersection of two lines of position; this is the smaller angle between these two lines.

CUT

cut

(1) Remove. Delete. See cut and paste.

(2) In a video or movie, a sharp transition from one scene to another.

(3) A Unix command that extracts data from a file based on its location within the file.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Tom Jones performance in Northumberland was cut short
Following the ceremony at London's O2 area, the show's organisers released a statement saying: "We regret this happened and we send our deepest apologies to Adele that her big moment was cut short due to the live show over running.
New Zealand professional Ben McCord picked up 3-31 and then top-scored with 52 as Burscough got as far as 156 when their chase was cut short.
The company said that the test flight was cut short as a precaution.
He enrolled at medical school but the Japanese invasion cut short his studies and he left for Europe, walking straight into World War II.
But the guidelines are meaningless unless the government uses them to save some of the hundreds of thousands of lives that are cut short every year by poor diets.
Reading the story about a strange old hermit that lived at the base of the canyon; diamonds long lost; a life cut short and a life lived in limbo left me wanting to know more and see more of these characters.
That leaves Freedom Land to stand alone as a testimony to a budding novelist whose writing career was tragically cut short.
Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri on Tuesday cut short her state visit to Pakistan by nearly four hours reportedly due to security concerns and advice from her security detail.
Fast's translation allows, however, a degree of manipulation--statements cut short or words subtly changed in the subtitles--that transforms the soldiers' factual account into absurd utterances, acting as a powerful metaphor for a more far-reaching distortion of truth for political ends.
But while the school allowed other students to present books dealing with a broad variety of Christmas traditions, Laura's presentation was allegedly cut short by her teacher due to its "religious" content.
Syracuse University was one of the first schools to cut short its program in Hong Kong; arrangements were made for students to return home in early April.