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small, one-masted sailing vessel, with a rig similar to that of a sloopsloop,
fore-and-aft-rigged, single-masted sailing vessel with a single headsail jib. A sloop differs from a cutter in that it has a jibstay—a support leading from the bow to the masthead on which the jib is set.
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 except that it usually has a sliding bowsprit and a topmast. From 1800 to 1830 cutters were in service between England and France. They were also employed to pursue smugglers, their speed and easy handling fitting them admirably for the task. These revenue cutters were so well known that the name was applied to the revenue vessel even after steam had replaced sails, and vessels of the Coast Guard are still called cutters. The name is also used for a heavy rowboat carried on large ships.



a small boat or combat ship. Cutters range in length from 1.5 to 40 m and are up to 7 m in width, with displacements from a few dozen kilograms to 150 metric tons. Cruising speeds are from 3 to 70 knots (5.5– km/hr). The underwater body of a cutter may be of a keel type or a flat-bottom type with or without planing steps. Cutters may have displacement, hydroplane, or hover propulsion and may be powered by steam, internal combustion, or gas turbine engines or by sails and oars. Screw, airscrew, or water jet propellers may be employed.

In navies, cutters are used as combat ships, auxiliary vessels, and base floating facilities. Combat cutters of modern naviesinclude rocket, gun, and torpedo boats, antisubmarine vessels, minesweepers, patrol boats, and landing craft. Cutters areequipped with rockets, cannon, and torpedoes, depending ontheir function. Cutters employed as auxiliary vessels or basefloating facilities include tugboats and hydrographic, diving, am-bulance, rescue, and passenger boats. Passenger and rescue craftcan be part of the equipment of large warships and of auxiliarycommercial and industrial boats. In commerce, cutters are usedfor transporting passengers, carrying small cargoes, towing smallbarges, and fishing, as well as for scientific investigation, pilottransit, and patrol duty. In motorboating, racing and pleasureboats with stationary or removable motors are used. Cuttersequipped with sails and oars have ten to 14 oars, double masts, and a transom stern.



(engineering acoustics)
An electromagnetic or piezoelectric device that converts an electric input to a mechanical output, used to drive the stylus that cuts a wavy groove in the highly polished wax surface of a recording disk. Also known as cutting head; head; phonograph cutter; recording head.
(mechanical engineering)
(mining engineering)
An operator of a coal-cutting or rock-cutting machine, or a worker engaged in underholing by pick or drill.
A joint, usually a dip joint, running in the direction of working; usually in the plural.

cutter, rubber

A soft brick, sometimes used for facework because of the facility with which it can be cut or rubbed down.


1. a sailing boat with its mast stepped further aft so as to have a larger foretriangle than that of a sloop
2. a ship's boat, powered by oars or sail, for carrying passengers or light cargo
3. a small lightly armed boat, as used in the enforcement of customs regulations
References in classic literature ?
Then the vessel resumed its course, still escorted by the little cutter, which sailed side by side with it, menacing it with the mouths of its six cannon.
Of those three varieties of fore-and-aft rig, the cutter - the racing rig PAR EXCELLENCE - is of an appearance the most imposing, from the fact that practically all her canvas is in one piece.
That may point to carelessness or it may point to agitation and hurry upon the part of the cutter.
Frome heard the girl's voice, gaily incredulous: "What on earth's your father's cutter doin' down there?
A groom took the cutter to the stables, and Archer struck through the park to the high-road.
He left a son and a daughter, both worthy of the name they were called upon to bear; the son, a cutter as unerring and exact as the square rule; the daughter, apt at embroidery, and at designing ornaments.
As they looked in the direction he indicated all saw a graceful, white cutter gliding around a nearby turn.
Jacks noticed that although a paper cutter was lying by their side the leaves of all were uncut.
He declined to sleep ashore, took his orders, and went back on board the cutter.
Then the cutter, along with all her wealth of hoop-iron, tobacco, knives and calico, had gone up into the air and fallen back into the sea in scattered and fragmented nothingness.
He had been a member of the crew of the smuggling schooner Halcyon when she was captured by a revenue cutter.
But daylight brought a cutter, in which were two white men, who were not afraid of eleven Malaita men armed with twelve rifles.