cutting


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cutting,

in horticulture, part of a plant stem, leaf, or root cut off and used for producing a new plant. It is a convenient and inexpensive method of propagation, not possible for all plants but used generally for grapes; chrysanthemums; verbenas (stem cuttings); blackberries (root cuttings); African violets (leaf cuttings); and for many other plants. Cuttings, as soon as they are made, are usually placed in moist sand, frequently heated from below; if taken in the fall, as hardwood cuttings of trees or shrubs, they are kept in unheated sand over the winter and planted in the spring. The word cutting alone usually means stem cutting; slip is a common synonym. The general availability today of rooting hormones and misting devices has made possible the propagation by cuttings of many kinds of plants that had not previously responded favorably.

Bibliography

See G. W. Adriance and F. R. Brison, Propagation of Horticultural Plants (2d ed. 1955); H. Hartmann and D. E. Kester, Plant Propagation (5th ed. 1990).

Cutting

 

a part of a plant used for vegetative propagation. Cuttings are obtained from high-quality plants. Plants grown from cuttings retain the properties and characteristics of the maternal plant. There are root, stem, and leaf cuttings. Under certain growing conditions, roots form on stem cuttings, buds on root cuttings, and both buds and roots on leaf cuttings. The ability of plants to propagate by cuttings depends on the species and varietal characteristics of the maternal plants as well as on external conditions, for example, temperature, humidity, and aeration.

cutting

[′kəd·iŋ]
(botany)
A piece of plant stem with one or more nodes, which, when placed under suitable conditions, will produce roots and shoots resulting in a complete plant.

cutting

A short piece of lumber resulting from crosscutting or ripping operations.

cutting

1. Horticulture
a. a method of vegetative propagation in which a part of a plant, such as a stem or leaf, is induced to form its own roots
b. a part separated for this purpose
2. Films the editing process by which a film is cut and made
3. Civil Engineering an excavation in a piece of high land for a road, railway, etc., enabling it to remain at approximately the same level
References in periodicals archive ?
Chipping and breakage of the cutting edge are the most common causes of cutting tool failure.
3) Arata's model was upgraded by Iverson and Powell by describing more accurately the cyclic laser cutting oxidation processes (Iverson et al.
She says no one but her closest friends knew about the cutting for two years.
T-Series and S-Series feature easy-access cutting chambers for simplified maintenance and cleaning.
Instead of cutting through those with a band saw, we can put them on this thing and it cuts through it like a hot knife through butter.
After the test, the cutting tool (insert) is removed and measured for flank wear.
That's right, friends, he's cutting winter heating subsidies to the elderly so rich people can have more money.
The system incorporates a special servo drive system to control the variation of movement in the knife drums, resulting in a system that can deliver variable cutting lengths from 400 mm to 1600 mm at very high production speeds.
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin reported that used plastic cutting boards could be cleaned and disinfected only in a dishwasher, while hot soapy water in the sink was enough for used wooden cutting boards.
To advocates of integrated cost reduction, such "siloing" is one of the major sins of cost cutting.
President and General Manager Carole Moore Cutting is looking for national advertisers.
At CB Richard Ellis, management is attempting to cut costs without cutting back on their staff.