cyanosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

cyanosis

(sī'ənō`sĭs), bluish coloration of the skin, mucous membranes, and nailbeds, resulting from a lack of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood. It is a symptom of many disorders, including various pulmonary and heart diseases and many congenital heart defects (see blue babyblue baby,
infant born with a congenital heart defect that causes a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of cyanosis (deoxygenated blood). The color is most noticeable around the lips and at the tips of the fingers and toes.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose, ears). In such cases the capillary blood gives up more than normal amounts of oxygen. Although this type of cyanosis can be caused by reduced cardiac output (e.g., in congestive heart failure), the most common causes are nervous tension and exposure to cold. Another type of cyanosis results from poisoning, either by nitrates in contaminated food or water or by certain chemicals and drugs.

Cyanosis

 

in medicine, a bluish violet discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes that occurs with human diseases accompanied by circulatory and respiratory disorders.


Cyanosis

 

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes. The condition ranges in coloration from gray-blue to black-blue (“cast iron”). Cyanosis is due to an increase in the concentration (more than 5 g percent) of reduced hemoglobin, which has a bluish coloration, in capillary blood. Intense cyanosis of the extremities is called acrocyanosis. A distinction is made between central cyanosis, which results from a disturbance of oxygen saturation of blood in the lungs, and peripheral cyanosis, which results from a slowing of the blood flow and from extensive oxygen extraction into the surrounding tissues. Central cyanosis is observed mainly in pulmonary diseases, congenital heart diseases, and poisonings by carbon dioxide and aniline derivatives. Peripheral cyanosis is seen in heart diseases caused by circulatory disturbances and conditions such as thrombophlebitis and Raynaud’s disease in which a local slowing of blood flow occurs. False cyanosis is caused by a change in the color of the skin itself.

cyanosis

[‚sī·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
A bluish coloration in the skin and mucous membranes due to deficient levels of oxygen in the blood.

cyanosis

Pathol a bluish-purple discoloration of skin and mucous membranes usually resulting from a deficiency of oxygen in the blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyanosis and clubbing in a patient with iatrogenic Lutembacher syndrome.
Shows Right Hand Cyanosis Disappeared after 3 days of Treatment
The presence of cyanosis and brown blood in the neonate further supports an [alpha] chain variant, since a [beta] chain mutation would present several months later due to low [beta] chain expression at birth.
cyanosis is associated with fetal growth retardation.
The peripheral cyanosis you've noticed may be due to a condition called Raynaud's phenomenon, which causes spasms, constriction, and narrowing of the tiny blood vessels in the fingers and toes.
Similar result was shown by Pavo'n D et al [7] where correlation for cyanosis and respiratory rate was less as compared to wheezing and accessory muscle use as in us.
Speaking about shunt dependent oxygen therapy, he said that one should limit O2 therapy for cyanosis.
A 45-year-old female patient who had a 10-year history of SLE presented to our outpatient rheumatology clinic with complaints of severe pain and cyanosis along with appearance of digital ulcers on her fingers (Figure 1).
Organophosphorus poisoning can be differenciate from other condition when an animal is presents with signs of sweating, iosis, tearing, excess salivation, excessive respiratory tract secretions, vomiting, cyanosis, involuntary muscle twitching, convulsion, coma, loss of reflexes and loss of sphincter control (John et al.
Lesions observed in the circulatory system included congestion (Figures 1 and 2) and cyanosis of comb and wattle, comb and wattle edema, and facial and subcutaneous edema.
Coldness, pallor, and cyanosis developed in the distal region of the right forearm soon after venipuncture of the right antecubital vein.
Shortly after presentation, the patient lost consciousness, developed cyanosis, bradycardia and an apparent convulsion, resulting in asystolic cardiac arrest.