cyanosis

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Related to cyanotic: Cyanotic heart disease

cyanosis

(sī'ənō`sĭs), bluish coloration of the skin, mucous membranes, and nailbeds, resulting from a lack of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood. It is a symptom of many disorders, including various pulmonary and heart diseases and many congenital heart defects (see blue babyblue baby,
infant born with a congenital heart defect that causes a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of cyanosis (deoxygenated blood). The color is most noticeable around the lips and at the tips of the fingers and toes.
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). Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose, ears). In such cases the capillary blood gives up more than normal amounts of oxygen. Although this type of cyanosis can be caused by reduced cardiac output (e.g., in congestive heart failure), the most common causes are nervous tension and exposure to cold. Another type of cyanosis results from poisoning, either by nitrates in contaminated food or water or by certain chemicals and drugs.

Cyanosis

 

in medicine, a bluish violet discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes that occurs with human diseases accompanied by circulatory and respiratory disorders.


Cyanosis

 

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes. The condition ranges in coloration from gray-blue to black-blue (“cast iron”). Cyanosis is due to an increase in the concentration (more than 5 g percent) of reduced hemoglobin, which has a bluish coloration, in capillary blood. Intense cyanosis of the extremities is called acrocyanosis. A distinction is made between central cyanosis, which results from a disturbance of oxygen saturation of blood in the lungs, and peripheral cyanosis, which results from a slowing of the blood flow and from extensive oxygen extraction into the surrounding tissues. Central cyanosis is observed mainly in pulmonary diseases, congenital heart diseases, and poisonings by carbon dioxide and aniline derivatives. Peripheral cyanosis is seen in heart diseases caused by circulatory disturbances and conditions such as thrombophlebitis and Raynaud’s disease in which a local slowing of blood flow occurs. False cyanosis is caused by a change in the color of the skin itself.

cyanosis

[‚sī·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
A bluish coloration in the skin and mucous membranes due to deficient levels of oxygen in the blood.

cyanosis

Pathol a bluish-purple discoloration of skin and mucous membranes usually resulting from a deficiency of oxygen in the blood
References in periodicals archive ?
1) New Generation and Old Generation Pulse Oxymeters in Children with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease.
March 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Masimo, the inventor of Pulse CO-Oximetry and Read-Through Motion and Low Perfusion Pulse Oximetry, reported that an independent study presented at the 2007 Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Annual Meeting in Orlando clearly demonstrated the superiority of Masimo LNOP Blue Sensors in providing accurate, reliable and continuous pulse oximetry readings in cyanotic infants with congenital heart disease.
Methods: In this case-controlled cross-sectional study, the study groups consisted of 29 patients with cyanotic heart disease, 30 patients with acyanotic heart disease, and a control group of 32 healthy individuals.
Cox's specific interest was the performance of pulse oximeters on babies with cyanotic congenital cardiac lesions (CCCL) which typically are kept at very low blood oxygen levels to maintain a balance of blood flow to the lungs and the body.
The diagnosis of metHb should be suspected in patients that appear cyanotic and have a low pulse oximetry reading yet have no apparent respiratory or cardiovascular problems to explain the low [O.
There is scarce data in literature regarding the association between congenital heart disease and oxidative stress in children with cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease.
Additional studies presented at the ASA included "The Accuracy of Masimo SET and Nellcor N-595 in Children with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease" conducted by Yuichiro Toda, M.
On October 24, 2005 at the ASA conference, an independent research team from Texas Children's Hospital at Baylor College of Medicine presented study results on the Masimo SET LNOP Blue Sensor, which is the first device of its kind specifically designed -- and cleared by the FDA -- for accurately monitoring blood oxygen levels in cyanotic infants.
1,2) Due to complex cyanotic CHD, heterotaxy syndrome presents early in childhood in most affected individuals.
25 /PRNewswire/ -- Masimo(R), the inventor of Pulse CO-Oximetry(TM) and Read-Through Motion and Low Perfusion Pulse Oximetry, announced an important milestone for care of cyanotic infants and children with the FDA clearance of the Masimo SET LNOP(R) Blue sensor.