cyberpunk


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cyberpunk

/si:'ber-puhnk/ (Originally coined by SF writer Bruce Bethke and/or editor Gardner Dozois) A subgenre of SF launched in 1982 by William Gibson's epoch-making novel "Neuromancer" (though its roots go back through Vernor Vinge's "True Names" to John Brunner's 1975 novel "The Shockwave Rider"). Gibson's near-total ignorance of computers and the present-day hacker culture enabled him to speculate about the role of computers and hackers in the future in ways hackers have since found both irritatingly na"ive and tremendously stimulating. Gibson's work was widely imitated, in particular by the short-lived but innovative "Max Headroom" TV series. See cyberspace, ice, jack in, go flatline.

Since 1990 or so, popular culture has included a movement or fashion trend that calls itself "cyberpunk", associated especially with the rave/techno subculture. Hackers have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, self-described cyberpunks too often seem to be shallow trendoids in black leather who have substituted enthusiastic blathering about technology for actually learning and *doing* it. Attitude is no substitute for competence. On the other hand, at least cyberpunks are excited about the right things and properly respectful of hacking talent in those who have it. The general consensus is to tolerate them politely in hopes that they'll attract people who grow into being true hackers.

cyberpunk

See CYBERCULTURE.

cyberpunk

A futuristic, online delinquent: breaking into computer systems; surviving by high-tech wits. The term comes from science fiction novels such as "Neuromancer" and "Shockwave Rider." See steampunk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyberpunk heroes are outsiders, often like Robin Hood, Covell said.
Para Lemos (2004), o enfoque da ficcao cyberpunk sao as minoras e como elas subvertem o "sistema" pelo uso da tecnologia.
Gibson's Neuromancer, the cornerstone of the cyberpunk subgenre, already features the merging of two rudimentary AIs, Wintermute and Neuromancer, into a larger artificial life form.
This outline is necessary, though, to indicate how, in some moods at least, Jameson now sees realism as an exhausted and socially spent form supplanted by cyberpunk and science fiction.
Such arguments about the reproduction of the dominant culture's ideological framework have been made about cyberpunk in general, and Gibson's Neuromancer trilogy in particular.
John Shirley is a very progressive writer of the cyberpunk novel and the first easily identifiable writer of this genre.
Indeed she suggests that, in discourses such as cyberpunk, it is primarily men who are fetishised.
Except that cyberpunk has anticipated such stuff, has got the pomo jump on the mainstream.
Sirius cofounded Mondo 2000 magazine and is the author of Cyberpunk Handbook: The Real Cyberpunk Fake Book, New York: Random House, 1995.
A fast-paced cyberpunk thriller, "Hackers" delivers a humorous but sobering wake-up call to the '90s video game/computer generation concerning the enormous power at their fingertips.
The term cyberPUNK has been used to refer to someone who has vast knowledge of the computer and internet world, which fits right in to our corporation.
Rollerblade Runner: In a risky melange of the over-the-top apocalyptic gladiator classic ``Rollerball'' and the cyberpunk thriller ``Blade Runner,'' this film pits James Caan against Harrison Ford in a high-stakes, to-the-death in-line skating duel set against the backdrop of a nuclear-winterized Los Angeles, which is ruled by heartless androids (led by Mayor Robby the Robot) who consume human flesh for energy.