cyberpunk


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cyberpunk

/si:'ber-puhnk/ (Originally coined by SF writer Bruce Bethke and/or editor Gardner Dozois) A subgenre of SF launched in 1982 by William Gibson's epoch-making novel "Neuromancer" (though its roots go back through Vernor Vinge's "True Names" to John Brunner's 1975 novel "The Shockwave Rider"). Gibson's near-total ignorance of computers and the present-day hacker culture enabled him to speculate about the role of computers and hackers in the future in ways hackers have since found both irritatingly na"ive and tremendously stimulating. Gibson's work was widely imitated, in particular by the short-lived but innovative "Max Headroom" TV series. See cyberspace, ice, jack in, go flatline.

Since 1990 or so, popular culture has included a movement or fashion trend that calls itself "cyberpunk", associated especially with the rave/techno subculture. Hackers have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, self-described cyberpunks too often seem to be shallow trendoids in black leather who have substituted enthusiastic blathering about technology for actually learning and *doing* it. Attitude is no substitute for competence. On the other hand, at least cyberpunks are excited about the right things and properly respectful of hacking talent in those who have it. The general consensus is to tolerate them politely in hopes that they'll attract people who grow into being true hackers.

cyberpunk

See CYBERCULTURE.

cyberpunk

A futuristic, online delinquent: breaking into computer systems; surviving by high-tech wits. The term comes from science fiction novels such as "Neuromancer" and "Shockwave Rider." See steampunk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, the original analyses that Lavigne performs are often lost in the lengthy explanations of cyberpunk as a genre and the covering of other scholars' existing work in the area.
Another groundbreaking book in cyberpunk is Philip K.
Postcyberpunk, on the other hand, never garnered an enthusiastic attention and, to date, it has been neglected as a genre, although its relevance demands a profound definition, especially because of its pivotal contributions to the topoi that cyberpunk overlooked such as reproduction, feminism, social progress, biopolitics, familial structures, education, ecology, psychology and health.
McHale's linking of cyberpunk with postmodernism has occasioned many a conversation about the politics of academic canonicity and the deleterious effects of the marketing decisions of publishing houses on the subgenre.
Teniendo como precedente la novela 1984 (1948), de George Orwell--que en si misma es una distopia--, el cyberpunk se enfoca en historias futuristas en las que los seres humanos han perdido ciertas cualidades de seres civilizados, lo que ocasiona que se conviertan en un numero mas dentro de una interminable cadena, como le sucede al protagonista del primer largometraje de George Lucas, THX1138 (1971), un titulo que mas bien nos podria remitir al sistema de sonido del mismo nombre, (6) o a la matricula de un automovil.
O cyberpunk e um genero literario desenvolvido no interior de outro genero, a FC.
In Cyberpunk and Cyberculture (2000), Dani Cavallaro identifies a new account of the Gothic, one which is at home in cyberspace and the representations thereof.
The reading list includes a cyberpunk novel (Snowcrash by Neal Stephenson); a business biography from a former cartoonist at Hallmark Cards (Orbiting The Giant Hairball by Gordon MacKenzie); and an assortment of books about the information revolution with varying degrees of obscurity (The Hacker Ethic by Pekka Himanen, The Unfinished Revolution by Michael Dertouzous, and Just For Fun, by Linus Torvalds.
Its inhabitants, who converse in a quasi-absurdist mixture of reality-TV banalities and over-the-top cyberpunk argot, are equally heterogeneous, encompassing every imaginable social type, from ladies who lunch to a bizarre gang of pseudo-Hasidic squatters.
Bruce Sterling, Preface to Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (xi)
She could not be so effective, however, without the assistance of her cyberpunk little sister Sue (Zhao Wei).
Taking their cue from him, the cyberpunk novelists of the 1980s may not have had anything like the same level of antipathy, but it was cyberspace, not outerspace, they looked to for the most part.