cyberspace


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cyberspace

all of the data stored in a large computer or network represented as a three-dimensional model through which a virtual-reality user can move

cyberspace

the communications 'S pace’, including virtual realities, made available by the radically expanding world-wide network of electronic, especially computer-based, communications (e.g. the INTERNET). See also INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.

cyberspace

[′sī·bər‚spās]
(computer science)
The digital realms, including Web sites and virtual worlds.

cyberspace

(jargon)
/si:'ber-spays/ 1. (Coined by William Gibson) Notional "information-space" loaded with visual cues and navigable with brain-computer interfaces called "cyberspace decks"; a characteristic prop of cyberpunk SF. In 1991 serious efforts to construct virtual reality interfaces modelled explicitly on Gibsonian cyberspace were already under way, using more conventional devices such as glove sensors and binocular TV headsets. Few hackers are prepared to deny outright the possibility of a cyberspace someday evolving out of the network (see network, the).

2. Occasionally, the metaphoric location of the mind of a person in hack mode. Some hackers report experiencing strong eidetic imagery when in hack mode; interestingly, independent reports from multiple sources suggest that there are common features to the experience. In particular, the dominant colours of this subjective "cyberspace" are often grey and silver, and the imagery often involves constellations of marching dots, elaborate shifting patterns of lines and angles, or moire patterns.

cyberspace

Coined by William Gibson in his 1984 novel "Neuromancer," it is a futuristic computer network that people use by plugging their minds into it! The term now refers to the Internet or to the online or digital world in general. Contrast with meatspace. See Internet, virtual reality and DOD cyberspace glossary.
References in periodicals archive ?
As warfare in the cyberspace domain becomes more prominent and crosses the physical domains of land, air, sea, and space, the Army will more frequently use cyberspace as a means to retain freedom of movement and to accomplish the joint force commander's objectives.
She furthered that Liberia has also created the legal, regulatory and enabling environment thereby leaving its footprint in cyberspace.
Lessig proposes that cyberspace is a less regulable space than real space.
Cyberspace also extends to the private sector and among global partnerships and lacks geographic boundaries.
The most consistent trend noted across the research efforts to identify key terrain in cyberspace was a desire to create lists of devices, logical constructs, personas, and processes that constitute cyber key terrain.
Creating a proficient cadre of cyberspace operators is one of my top priorities.
Cyberspace IT workforce: Personnel who design, build, configure, operate, and maintain IT, networks, and capabilities.
Is flexibility even a meaningful concept when every device in cyberspace is actually running a complex rule-set that predetermines its actions in response to a given set of inputs?
Threats to the conduct of military operations exist in cyberspace resulting in the constant necessity to manage risk and protect portions of cyberspace.
He added that cyberspace issues have been rapidly gaining prominence around the world, grabbing headlines and topping the agendas of bilateral summits.
Steven Bucci's "Joining Cybercrime and Cyberterrorism: A Likely Scenario" lays out a useful rubric for understanding the operational environment of cyberspace and employs time-tested "most dangerous/most likely" threat-evaluation analysis.
We should also look to Sun Tzu for guidance because intelligence, deception, and the relationship between things in cyberspace require a different way of thinking; where force-on-force is often less effective toward achieving our objective than appropriate nonkinetic methods.