cycles per second


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cycles per second

The number of times an event or set of events is repeated in a second. See Hertz.

frequency

The number of oscillations per second (a) of the current or voltage in an alternating-current electric circuit, or (b) of a sound wave, or (c) of a vibrating solid object; expressed in hertz (abbr. Hz) or in cycles per second (abbr. cps).
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of the frequency spectrum of noise exposure, noise-induced hearing loss usually occurs first in a frequency of approximately 3,000 to 6,000 cycles per second.
His invention was simply a chain that sends out a sound of 34,200 cycles per second when shaken.
Using a conventional compiler with 42 instruction cycles per interrupt (168 clock cycles per interrupt), saving and restoring the context will use over 4,032,000 CPU cycles per second or 20 percent of the available cycles on a 20 MHz PIC16.
The transition occurs at a frequency of 9,192,631,770 cycles per second.
This new technology provides regular, repeatable pulses at a very high rate of speed, up to 10 cycles per second and is designed to have an extended life cycle of >50 million cycles.
6 cycles per second, which is close to a key electrical frequency in the brain.
In the US Apple cut the price of its 1 gigahertz Power Mac G4, which runs at a speed of 1 billion cycles per second, to $1,499 from $1,699.
The conveyor operates at 30 cycles per second, with a stroke of 0.
The frequency of electric current varies every now and then--it can go from 60 cycles per second to 59, and that causes problems.
The higher the clock speed, the greater the number of cycles per second.
Adrija Puharich of Stanford Research Institute (now called SRI International) wrote in a book that when Uri Geller was bending a spoon, under the watchful eyes of scientists at SRI, his brain was registering the delta wave, which ranges from almost zero to four cycles per second.
Proven to produce the strange noises in a lab by oscillating the special feathers to the same frequency as the sound made by the manakin, 1500 hertz or 1,500 cycles per second, researchers have the first proof of feathers playing a role in song.